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Families and Social Security

Author

Listed:
  • Hans Fehr
  • Manuel Kallweit
  • Fabian Kindermann

Abstract

The present paper quantifies the importance of family insurance for the analysis of social security. We therefore augment the standard overlapping generations model with idiosyncratic labor productivity and longevity risk in that we account for gender and marital status. We simulate the abolition of pay-as-you-go pension payments, calculate the resulting intergenerational welfare changes and isolates aggregate efficiency effects for singles and families by means of compensating transfers. In accordance with previous studies that take into account transitional dynamics, we find that abolishing social security creates significant efficiency losses. Most importantly, however, we show that singles are substantially worse off from a shut-down of old-age payments compared to married couples. A decomposition of the efficiency loss reveals that this difference can be almost exclusively attributed to the insurance role of the family with respect to longevity risk. Since a married individual inherits her spouse’s wealth after his death and the likelihood that both partners reach a very old age is relatively small, marriage serves as an insurance device against longevity risk for the surviving partner.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans Fehr & Manuel Kallweit & Fabian Kindermann, 2015. "Families and Social Security," CESifo Working Paper Series 5655, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5655
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Bucciol & Laura Cavalli & Igor Fedotenkov & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2015. "Public policies over the life cycle: a large scale OLG model for France, Italy and Sweden," Working Papers 29/2015, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    2. Joanna Tyrowicz & Magdalena Smyk & Lucas van der Velde, 2018. "A cautionary note on the reliability of the online survey data - the case of Wage Indicator," GRAPE Working Papers 26, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    3. Georges, Patrick & Seçkin, Aylin, 2016. "From pro-natalist rhetoric to population policies in Turkey? An OLG general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 79-93.
    4. repec:sgh:gosnar:y:2017:i:4:p:63-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:poleco:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:104-127 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Alessandro Bucciol & Laura Cavalli & Igor Fedotenkov & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2014. "A large scale OLG model for France, Italy and Sweden: assessing the interpersonal and intrapersonal redistributive effects of public policies," Working Papers 07/2014, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    7. Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz & Magda Malec, 2018. "Evaluating welfare and economic effects of raised fertility," GRAPE Working Papers 25, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    stochastic general equilibrium; home production; family insurance;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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