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Taxing capital along the transition—Not a bad idea after all?

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  • Fehr, Hans
  • Kindermann, Fabian

Abstract

This paper quantitatively characterizes optimal tax systems in a model of overlapping generations, when transitional cohorts are explicitly taken into account. We use the recent study of Conesa et al. (2009) as an example, but extend it by transitional dynamics. We furthermore develop a general and coherent way of aggregating welfare effects of different individuals and cohorts in the short- and the long-run. Our welfare measure includes the case of a utilitarian social welfare function, yet is not limited to this perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Fehr, Hans & Kindermann, Fabian, 2015. "Taxing capital along the transition—Not a bad idea after all?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 64-77.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:51:y:2015:i:c:p:64-77
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2014.09.024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hans Fehr & Fabian Kindermann, 2012. "Optimal Taxation with Current and Future Cohorts," CESifo Working Paper Series 3973, CESifo.
    2. Conesa, Juan Carlos & Krueger, Dirk, 2006. "On the optimal progressivity of the income tax code," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 1425-1450, October.
    3. Juan Carlos Conesa & Sagiri Kitao & Dirk Krueger, 2009. "Taxing Capital? Not a Bad Idea after All!," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 25-48, March.
    4. Jonathan Heathcote & Kjetil Storesletten & Giovanni L. Violante, 2017. "Optimal Tax Progressivity: An Analytical Framework," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 1693-1754.
    5. Fehr, Hans & Kallweit, Manuel & Kindermann, Fabian, 2013. "Should pensions be progressive?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 94-116.
    6. Peterman, William B., 2013. "Determining the motives for a positive optimal tax on capital," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 265-295.
    7. Kenichi Fukushima, 2011. "Quantifying the Welfare Gains from Flexible Dynamic Income Tax Systems," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd10-176, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Kitao, Sagiri, 2010. "Labor-dependent capital income taxation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(8), pages 959-974, November.
    9. Shinichi Nishiyama & Kent Smetters, 2005. "Consumption Taxes and Economic Efficiency with Idiosyncratic Wage Shocks," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 1088-1115, October.
    10. Gervais, Martin, 2012. "On the optimality of age-dependent taxes and the progressive U.S. tax system," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 682-691.
    11. Huang, He & Ä°Mrohorogë‡Lu, Selahattin & Sargent, Thomas J., 1997. "Two Computations To Fund Social Security," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 7-44, January.
    12. Dirk Krueger & Alexander Ludwig, 2013. "Optimal Progressive Labor Income Taxation and Education Subsidies When Education Decisions and Intergenerational Transfers Are Endogenous," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 496-501, May.
    13. Sagiri Kitao, 2010. "Labor-dependent capital income taxation that encourages work and saving," Staff Reports 435, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chung Tran & Sebastian Wende, 2017. "On the Marginal Excess Burden of Taxation in an Overlapping Generations Model," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2017-652, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    2. Kirkby, Robert, 2017. "Transition paths for Bewley-Huggett-Aiyagari models: Comparison of some solution algorithms," Working Paper Series 5642, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Cagri S. Kumru & John Piggott, 2017. "Optimal Capital Income Taxation with Means-tested Benefits," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 64(3), pages 227-262, July.
    4. Fehr, Hans & Kallweit, Manuel & Kindermann, Fabian, 2017. "Families and social security," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 30-56.
    5. Marchiori, Luca & Pierrard, Olivier, 2017. "How does global demand for financial services promote domestic growth in Luxembourg? A dynamic general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 103-123.
    6. Stephie Fried & Kevin Novan & William Peterman, 2018. "The Distributional Effects of a Carbon Tax on Current and Future Generations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 30, pages 30-46, October.
    7. Woodland, A., 2016. "Taxation, Pensions, and Demographic Change," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, in: Piggott, John & Woodland, Alan (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 713-780, Elsevier.
    8. Fedotenkov, Igor, 2018. "Corruption vs reforms: Why do voters prefer the former?," MPRA Paper 89581, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Krueger, Dirk & Ludwig, Alexander, 2013. "On the Optimal Provision of Social Insurance," MEA discussion paper series 201302, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    10. Krueger, Dirk & Ludwig, Alexander, 2016. "On the optimal provision of social insurance: Progressive taxation versus education subsidies in general equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 72-98.
    11. Blandin, Adam & Peterman, William B., 2019. "Taxing capital? The importance of how human capital is accumulated," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 482-508.
    12. Michael Ben-Gad, 2017. "The Optimal Taxation Of Asset Income When Government Consumption Is Endogenous: Theory, Estimation And Welfare," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1689-1711, October.
    13. William B. Peterman & Erick Sager, 2018. "Optimal Public Debt with Life Cycle Motives," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-028, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    14. Ben Heijdra & Fabian Kindermann & Laurie Reijnders, 2017. "Life in shakles? The quantitative implications of reforming the educational financing system," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 37-57, April.
    15. Raei, Sepideh, 2020. "Gradual tax reforms: If you like it, you can keep it," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).
    16. Chung Tran & Sebastian Wende, 2020. "Incidence of Capital Income Taxation in a Lifecycle Economy with Firm Heterogeneity," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2019-670, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    17. Koulovatianos, Christos & Mavridis, Dimitris, 2018. "Increasing taxes after a financial crisis: Not a bad idea after all ..," CFS Working Paper Series 614, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stochastic OLG model; Precautionary savings; Intragenerational risk sharing and redistribution;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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