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Inequality in an OLG Economy with Heterogeneous Cohorts and Pension Systems

Author

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  • Tyrowicz, Joanna

    () (University of Warsaw)

  • Makarski, Krzysztof

    () (Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Bielecki, Marcin

    () (University of Warsaw)

Abstract

We analyze the consumption and wealth inequality in an OLG model with mandatory pension systems. Our framework features within cohort heterogeneity of endowments and heterogeneity of preferences. We allow for population aging and gradual decline in TFP growth. We show four main results. First, increasing longevity translates to substantial increases in aggregate consumption inequality and wealth inequality. Second, a pension system reform from a defined benefit to a defined contribution works to reinforce consumption inequality and reduce wealth inequality. Third, minimum pension benefits are able to partially counteract an increase in inequality introduced by the defined contribution system, at a fiscal cost. Fourth the minimum pension benefit guarantee mostly addresses the sources of inequality which stem from differentiated endowments rather than those which stem from heterogeneous preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Tyrowicz, Joanna & Makarski, Krzysztof & Bielecki, Marcin, 2018. "Inequality in an OLG Economy with Heterogeneous Cohorts and Pension Systems," IZA Discussion Papers 11621, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11621
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption; wealth; inequality; longevity; defined contribution; defined benefit;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • C60 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - General
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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