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Pension and Child Care Policies with Endogenous Fertility

  • Masaya Yasuoka
  • Naohisa Goto

This paper describes how a child allowance policy and income transfer to older people policy alter fertility and economic growth under a pay-as-you-go pension system. Moreover, this paper presents ways to finance such policies: one for income taxation and the other for consumption tax. The results presented in this paper are as follows. First, the relation between fertility and economic growth depends on fertility. This relation is positive if fertility is at a certain level. However, if fertility is low or high, this relation is negative. Second, a child allowance does not always raise the fertility rate. On the other hand, income transfer to older people raises the fertility rate. This result underscores that it is important to consider policies for older people when considering how to raise the fertility rate. Income transfer to older people financed by consumption taxation can achieve two goals: increasing fertility in a society with fewer children, and providing income security for older people.

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File URL: http://gcoe.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/research/discussion/2008/pdf/gd09-054.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series with number gd09-054.

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Date of creation: Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd09-054
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  1. Shuanglin Lin & Xiaowen Tian, 2003. "Population growth and social security financing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(1), pages 91-110, 02.
  2. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
  3. Joëlle Sleebos, 2003. "Low Fertility Rates in OECD Countries: Facts and Policy Responses," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 15, OECD Publishing.
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  5. Nishimura, Kazuo & Zhang, Junsen, 1992. "Pay-as-you-go public pensions with endogenous fertility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 239-258, July.
  6. Fanti, Luciano & Gori, Luca, 2009. "Population and neoclassical economic growth: A new child policy perspective," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 27-30, July.
  7. Eckstein, Zvi & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1985. "Endogenous fertility and optimal population size," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 93-106, June.
  8. Junsen Zhang & Junxi Zhang, 1998. "Social Security, Intergenerational Transfers, and Endogenous Growth," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(5), pages 1225-1241, November.
  9. Bas Groezen & Lex Meijdam, 2008. "Growing old and staying young: population policy in an ageing closed economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 573-588, July.
  10. Berthold U. Wigger, 1999. "Pay-as-you-go financed public pensions in a model of endogenous growth and fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 625-640.
  11. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1993. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 4550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Ono, Tetsuo, 2002. "Social Security Policy with Public Debt in an Aging Economy," Discussion Paper 107, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  13. Takashi Oshio & Masaya Yasuoka, 2009. "Maximum size of social security in a model of endogenous fertility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 644-654.
  14. Makoto Hirazawa & Akira Yakita, 2009. "Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 565-583, July.
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