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Fertility, Growth, and Public Investments in Children

Author

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  • Jie Zhang

Abstract

In this paper, it is shown how subsidies for education and for the number of children affect economic growth, fertility, and welfare in an endogenous growth model with altruistic agents. Subsidizing education has not only a direct positive effect on growth but also an indirect positive effect on growth through reducing fertility. After some finite periods, future generations will gain in welfare in the education-subsidy regime. In contrast, subsidizing the number of children increases fertility, depresses growth, and reduces all generations' welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Jie Zhang, 1997. "Fertility, Growth, and Public Investments in Children," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 835-843, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:30:y:1997:i:4:p:835-43
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    Cited by:

    1. Yasuoka, Masaya & Miyake, Atsushi, 2013. "Public debt, child allowances and pension benefits with endogenous fertility," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 7, pages 1-25.
    2. Zhang, Jie & Casagrande, Richard, 1998. "Fertility, growth, and flat-rate taxation for education subsidies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 209-216, August.
    3. Fanti, Luciano & Gori, Luca, 2011. "Child policy ineffectiveness in an overlapping generations small open economy with human capital accumulation and public education," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 404-409, January.
    4. Ishida, Ryo & Oguro, Kazumasa & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2015. "Population Density, Fertility, and Childcare Services From the Perspective of a Two-Region Overlapping Generations Model," CIS Discussion paper series 647, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Ko Shakuno, 2014. "Public education, endogenous fertility and economic growth," TERG Discussion Papers 319, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.
    6. Masatoshi Jinno & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Are the social security benefits of pensions or child-care policies best financed by a consumption tax?," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 12(3), pages 94-112, September.
    7. Masaya Yasuoka, 2013. "Can Child-Care Support Policies Halt Decreasing Fertility?," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 3(2), pages 409-419.
    8. Herbertsson, Tryggvi Thor, 2003. "Accounting for human capital externalities with an application to the Nordic countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 553-567, June.
    9. Papagni, Erasmo, 2006. "Household borrowing constraints, fertility dynamics, and economic growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 27-54, January.
    10. Masaya Yasuoka & Naohisa Goto, 2015. "How is the child allowance to be financed? By income tax or consumption tax?," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(3), pages 249-269, September.
    11. Megumi Mochida, 2005. "Child Allowances, Fertility, and Uncertain Lifetime," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 05-11, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    12. Leonid Azarnert, 2010. "Free education, fertility and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 449-468, March.
    13. Zhang, Junsen & Zhang, Jie & Lee, Ronald, 2001. "Mortality decline and long-run economic growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 485-507, June.
    14. Atsushi Miyake & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Which Should the Government Subsidize: Child Care or Elderly Care?," Discussion Paper Series 144, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jun 2016.
    15. Rahul A. Sirohi, 2014. "Child Labour, Human Capital Accumulation and Foreign Aid," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 1-14, September.

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