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Public debt, child allowances, and pension benefits with endogenous fertility

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  • Yasuoka, Masaya
  • Miyake, Atsushi

Abstract

The stock of public debt in some developed countries continues to increase because of a lack of tax revenues and the burdens of social security. Many of those developed countries suffer from lower birth rates. Child allowances might help to raise fertility, leading to higher tax revenue in the future because of an increase in the younger population. In this paper, the authors examine whether or not child allowances reduce the public debt stock as a share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in an economy with a pension system. As long as the long-run debt ratio is non-negative, child allowances financed by bonds always increase the public debt stock per unit of GDP.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasuoka, Masaya & Miyake, Atsushi, 2012. "Public debt, child allowances, and pension benefits with endogenous fertility," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-47, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwedp:201247
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhang, Jie & Zhang, Junsen, 2007. "Optimal social security in a dynastic model with investment externalities and endogenous fertility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 3545-3567, November.
    2. Bas Groezen & Lex Meijdam, 2008. "Growing old and staying young: population policy in an ageing closed economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 573-588, July.
    3. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    4. Grossman, Gene M. & Yanagawa, Noriyuki, 1993. "Asset bubbles and endogenous growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-19, February.
    5. Futagami, Koichi & Iwaisako, Tatsuro & Ohdoi, Ryoji, 2008. "Debt Policy Rule, Productive Government Spending, And Multiple Growth Paths," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(04), pages 445-462, September.
    6. Tetsuo Ono, 2003. "Social security policy with public debt in an aging economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 363-387, May.
    7. Wigger, Berthold U., 2009. "A note on public debt, tax-exempt bonds, and Ponzi games," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 492-499, September.
    8. Jie Zhang, 1997. "Fertility, Growth, and Public Investments in Children," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 835-843, November.
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    10. Meijdam, Lex & van de Ven, Martijn & Verbon, Harrie A. A., 1996. "The dynamics of government debt," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 67-90, April.
    11. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
    12. Yakita, Akira, 2008. "Sustainability of public debt, public capital formation, and endogenous growth in an overlapping generations setting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(3-4), pages 897-914, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    public debt; endogenous fertility; child allowances; pension;

    JEL classification:

    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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