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Collective Action and Armed Group Presence in Colombia

Author

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  • Margarita Gáfaro

    ()

  • Ana Maria Ibáñez

    ()

  • Patricia Justino

    ()

Abstract

The main objective of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the mechanisms that shape the relationship between violent conflict and collective action. Conflict dynamics in Colombia allow us to exploit rich variation in armed group presence and individual participation in local organizations. Our identification strategy is based on the construction of contiguous-pairs of rural communities that share common socio-economic characteristics but differ in armed group presence. This allows us to control for unobservable variables that may affect local participation and conflict dynamics simultaneously. The results show that the presence of armed groups increases overall participation in local organizations, with a particularly strong effect on political organizations. Contrary to existing results, we find that stronger individual participation may arise from coercion exercised by armed groups and not from a more vibrant civil society.

Suggested Citation

  • Margarita Gáfaro & Ana Maria Ibáñez & Patricia Justino, 2014. "Collective Action and Armed Group Presence in Colombia," Documentos CEDE 011951, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:011951
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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2014-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Shanker Satyanath & Nico Voigtlaender & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "Bowling for Fascism: Social Capital and the Rise of the Nazi Party," NBER Working Papers 19201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iván Higuera Mendieta, 2017. "Control armado y comportamiento electoral: Un cuasi-experimento en el Caguán," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 256, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    2. Max Schaub, 2014. "Solidarity with a sharp edge: Communal conflict and local collective action in rural Nigeria," HiCN Working Papers 183, Households in Conflict Network.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    collective action; political organizations; armed groups; violent shocks;

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