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Conflict and Social and Political Preferences: Evidence from World War II and Civil Conflict in 35 European Countries

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  • Pauline Grosjean

    (School of Economics, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, 2052 Sydney, NSW, Australia.)

Abstract

This paper uses new micro-level evidence from a nationally representative survey of 39,500 individuals in 35 countries to shed light on how individual experiences of conflict shape political and social preferences. The investigation covers World War II and recent civil conflict. Overwhelmingly, the results point to the negative and enduring legacy of war-related violence on political trust and perceived effectiveness of national institutions, although the effects are heterogeneous across different types (external versus internal) and outcomes (victory versus defeat) of conflict. Conflict spurs collective action, but of a dark nature, one associated with further erosion of social and political trust.

Suggested Citation

  • Pauline Grosjean, 2014. "Conflict and Social and Political Preferences: Evidence from World War II and Civil Conflict in 35 European Countries," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 56(3), pages 424-451, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:compes:v:56:y:2014:i:3:p:424-451
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N24 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: 1913-
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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