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The Economics of the Second World War: Seventy-Five Years On

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Listed:
  • Broadberry, Stephen
  • Harrison, Mark

Abstract

May 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe, a defining moment in modern history which signalled the beginning of the end of years of bloody conflict that left a world fragmented. The scale of mobilisation of all sectors of the economy and society had redefined the concept of ‘total war’. This eBook brings together recent research on a range of aspects of the war including the extensive war preparations of the great powers; the conduct of the war (including the management of economic mobilisation, economic warfare, economic exploitation, and the role of economists); and the war’s consequences for demography, inequality, economic recovery and political attitudes. Overall this eBook provides a unique insight into the importance of economics and the sometimes overlooked role that economists played in shaping the war and its outcomes.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Broadberry, Stephen & Harrison, Mark (ed.), 2020. "The Economics of the Second World War: Seventy-Five Years On," Vox eBooks, Centre for Economic Policy Research, number p326.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ebooks:p326
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