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Employment and Taxes

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  • Stephen Nickell

Abstract

This paper considers the impact of taxation policy on market work. On the basis of theevidence, we find that a 10 percentage point rise in the tax wedge will reduce overall labourinput provided via the market by around 2 per cent of the population of working age. The taxwedge is the sum of the payroll, income and consumption tax rates.This only explains a minority of the market work differentials across count ries. Muchof the remainder is probably down to the differences in the social security systems supportingthe unemployed, the sick and disabled and the early retired.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Nickell, 2004. "Employment and Taxes," CEP Discussion Papers dp0634, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0634
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anton Hallam & Ernst Juerg Weber, 2008. "Labour Taxes and Work Hours in Australia," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 11(2), pages 117-128, June.
    2. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2008. "Trends in Hours and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 239-256, April.
    3. Adam Wagstaff, 2010. "Social health insurance reexamined," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 503-517, May.
    4. Auray, Stéphane & Danthine, Samuel, 2010. "Bargaining frictions, labor income taxation, and economic performance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 778-802, August.
    5. Piekkola, Hannu, 2006. "Tax cuts and employment: Evidence from Finnish linked employer-employee data," Discussion Papers 1041, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    6. Batyra, Anna & Sneessens, Henri R., 2010. "Selective reductions in labor taxation: Labor market adjustments and macroeconomic performance," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 531-543, July.
    7. Rodolphe Desbordes & Céline Azémar, 2010. "Who Ultimately Bears the Burden of Greater Non-Wage Labour costs?," Working Papers 1004, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    8. Coenen, Günter & McAdam, Peter & Straub, Roland, 2008. "Tax reform and labour-market performance in the euro area: A simulation-based analysis using the New Area-Wide Model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 2543-2583, August.
    9. Sila, Urban, 2009. "Can family-support policies help explain differences in working hours across countries?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28684, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "Slovak Republic; Selected Issues and Statistical Appendix," IMF Staff Country Reports 05/72, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Fiori, Giuseppe & Nicoletti, Giuseppe & Scarpetta, Stefano & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 2007. "Employment Outcomes and the Interaction Between Product and Labor Market Deregulation: Are They Substitutes or Complements?," IZA Discussion Papers 2770, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Åsa Johansson, 2016. "Public Finance, Economic Growth and Inequality: A Survey of the Evidence," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1346, OECD Publishing.
    13. Eijffinger, S.C.W. & Rossi, A., 2006. "Structural Reforms and Growth : Product and Labor Market Deregulations," Discussion Paper 2006-112, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    14. Ignacio Zubriri, 2006. "Social Protection and Social Security Contributions in Spain," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0608, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    15. Peter Lindert & Gayle Allard, 2006. "EURO-PRODUCTIVITY AND EURO-JOBS SINCE THE 1960s: WHICH INSTITUTIONS REALLY MATTERED?," Working Papers 100, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    16. Jose Emilio Boscá & Rafael Domenech & Javier Ferri, 2008. "Tax Reforms and Labour-market Performance: An Evaluation for Spain using REMS," Working Papers 0804, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
    17. Ana Grdoviæ Gnip & Iva Tomic, 2010. "How hard does the tax bite hurt? Croatian vs. European worker," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 34(2), pages 109-142.
    18. Gayle Allard, 2006. "Euro-productivity and euro-jobs since the 1960s: which institutions mattered?," Working Papers Economia wp06-22, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
    19. Gayle Allard & Peter H. Lindert, 2006. "Euro-Productivity and Euro-Jobs since the 1960s: Which Institutions Really Mattered?," NBER Working Papers 12460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Brendan O'Connor, 2013. "The Structure of Ireland’s Tax System and Options for Growth Enhancing Reform," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(4), pages 511-540.
    21. Alberto Behar, 2009. "Tax Wedges, Unemployment Benefits and Labour Market Outcomes in the New EU Members," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 069-092, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Taxation; Labour Supply;

    JEL classification:

    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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