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A Meta-Analysis Of Technical Efficiency In Nigerian Agriculture

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  • Ogundari, Kolawole

Abstract

This study sheds light on how study specific-characteristics impact mean technical efficiency (MTE) in Nigerian agriculture. Also the paper extracts consensus message about MTE and its drivers in Nigerian agriculture based on studies covering the period 1999-2008. A meta-analysis using truncated regression was employed on a total of sixty four studies which yield eighty six observations for the econometric analysis. The regression results show that MTE in Nigerian agriculture increased significantly over the years. Study specific-characteristics such as sample size, number of inputs used as well as studies with focus on crop and livestock production were found to significantly impact MTE. Further analyses show that studies in the Northcentral, Southwest, and Southsouth regions of the country produced higher MTE. Within the sample, seventy one observations contain quantitative results on sources of technical efficiency differences usually incorporating socio-economic variables. Based on this, fifty three percent identified educations as a significant determinant of technical efficiency while thirty eight percent showed that experience is important. Extension is shown to be an important determinant by twenty three percent of the observations while nineteen percent identified age as significant determinant of technical efficiency in Nigerian agriculture over the years.

Suggested Citation

  • Ogundari, Kolawole, 2009. "A Meta-Analysis Of Technical Efficiency In Nigerian Agriculture," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50327, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:50327
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50327
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. N. Asadullah & S. Rahman, 2009. "Farm productivity and efficiency in rural Bangladesh: the role of education revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 17-33.
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    4. I. Okike & M.A. Jabbar & V.M. Manyong & J.W. Smith & S.K. Ehui, 2004. "Factors Affecting Farm-specific Production Efficiency in the Savanna Zones of West Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 13(1), pages 134-165, March.
    5. Phillips, Joseph M, 1994. "Farmer Education and Farmer Efficiency: A Meta-Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 149-165, October.
    6. Sharada Weir & John Knight, 2000. "Education externalities in rural Ethiopia: evidence from average and stochastic frontier production functions," CSAE Working Paper Series 2000-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. Thiam, Abdourahmane & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Rivas, Teodoro E., 2001. "Technical efficiency in developing country agriculture: a meta-analysis," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(2-3), September.
    8. Sebastian Hess & Stephan von Cramon-Taubadel, 2008. "A Meta-Analysis of General and Partial Equilibrium Simulations of Trade Liberalisation under the Doha Development Agenda," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(6), pages 804-840, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gelan, Ayele & Muriithi, Beatrice W., 0. "Examining Returns to Scale in Smallholder Dairy Farms in East Africa," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    2. Asekenye, Cresenia & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Deom, Mike & Kidula, Nelson & Okello, David Kalule & Okoko, Nasambu & Puppala, Naveen, 2016. "Productivity gaps among groundnut farmers in Kenya and Uganda: A stochastic production frontier analysis," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 11(2), June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Meta-regression; Technical Efficiency; Truncated Regression; Agriculture; Nigeria; Agricultural and Food Policy; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; D24; Q12;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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