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Alex Lennart Marten

Personal Details

First Name:Alex
Middle Name:Lennart
Last Name:Marten
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1348
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

National Center for Environmental Economics (NCEE)
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Government of the United States

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://yosemite1.epa.gov/ee/epa/eed.nsf/pages/homepage

: 202-566-2244

1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20460
RePEc:edi:nepgvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Elizabeth Kopits & Alex L. Marten & Ann Wolverton, 2013. "Moving Forward with Incorporating "Catastrophic" Climate Change into Policy Analysis," NCEE Working Paper Series 201301, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Jan 2013.
  2. Marten, Alex L., 2011. "Transient temperature response modeling in IAMs: the effects of over simplification on the SCC," Economics Discussion Papers 2011-11, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  3. Alex L. Marten & Stephen C. Newbold, 2011. "Estimating the Social Cost of Non-CO2 GHG Emissions: Methane and Nitrous Oxide," NCEE Working Paper Series 201101, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Feb 2011.
  4. Robin R. Jenkins & Heather Klemick & Elizabeth Kopits & Alex L. Marten, 2011. "CERCLA's Overlooked Cleanup Program: Emergency Response and Removal," NCEE Working Paper Series 201104, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised May 2011.
  5. Alex L. Marten & Christopher C. Moore, 2010. "An Options Based Bioeconomic Model for Biological and Chemical Control of Invasive Species," NCEE Working Paper Series 201006, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised May 2010.

Articles

  1. Alex L. Marten & Elizabeth A. Kopits & Charles W. Griffiths & Stephen C. Newbold & Ann Wolverton, 2015. "Incremental CH 4 and N 2 O mitigation benefits consistent with the US Government's SC-CO 2 estimates," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 272-298, March.
  2. Newbold, Stephen C. & Marten, Alex L., 2014. "The value of information for integrated assessment models of climate change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 111-123.
  3. Elizabeth Kopits & Alex Marten & Ann Wolverton, 2014. "Incorporating 'catastrophic' climate change into policy analysis," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 637-664, September.
  4. Alex Marten & Robert Kopp & Kate Shouse & Charles Griffiths & Elke Hodson & Elizabeth Kopits & Bryan Mignone & Chris Moore & Steve Newbold & Stephanie Waldhoff & Ann Wolverton, 2013. "Improving the assessment and valuation of climate change impacts for policy and regulatory analysis," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 433-438, April.
  5. Robin R. Jenkins & Heather Klemick & Elizabeth Kopits & Alex Marten, 2012. "Policy Monitor," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(2), pages 278-297, July.
  6. Marten, Alex L. & Newbold, Stephen C., 2012. "Estimating the social cost of non-CO2 GHG emissions: Methane and nitrous oxide," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 957-972.
  7. Marten, Alex L. & Moore, Christopher C., 2011. "An options based bioeconomic model for biological and chemical control of invasive species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 2050-2061, September.
  8. Marten, Alex L., 2011. "Transient temperature response modeling in IAMs: The effects of over simplification on the SCC," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 5, pages 1-42.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Marten, Alex L. & Newbold, Stephen C., 2012. "Estimating the social cost of non-CO2 GHG emissions: Methane and nitrous oxide," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 957-972.

    Mentioned in:

    1. What methane and Harrison Ford have in common
      by Jack Lienke in Grist Business and Technology on 2014-10-10 14:15:44

Working papers

  1. Elizabeth Kopits & Alex L. Marten & Ann Wolverton, 2013. "Moving Forward with Incorporating "Catastrophic" Climate Change into Policy Analysis," NCEE Working Paper Series 201301, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Jan 2013.

    Cited by:

    1. Toman, Michael, 2014. "The need for multiple types of information to inform climate change assessment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7094, The World Bank.
    2. de Zeeuw, Aart J. & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2014. "Climate Tipping and Economic Growth: Precautionary Saving and the Social Cost of Carbon," CEPR Discussion Papers 9982, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Nicholas Stern, 2013. "The Structure of Economic Modeling of the Potential Impacts of Climate Change: Grafting Gross Underestimation of Risk onto Already Narrow Science Models," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 838-859, September.

  2. Marten, Alex L., 2011. "Transient temperature response modeling in IAMs: the effects of over simplification on the SCC," Economics Discussion Papers 2011-11, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    Cited by:

    1. Richard S. J. Tol & In Chang Hwang & Frédéric Reynès, 2012. "The Effect of Learning on Climate Policy under Fat-tailed Uncertainty," Working Paper Series 5312, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    2. Raphael Calel & David Stainforth & Simon Dietz, 2015. "Tall tales and fat tails: the science and economics of extreme warming," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 127-141, September.
    3. Newbold, Stephen C. & Marten, Alex L., 2014. "The value of information for integrated assessment models of climate change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 111-123.
    4. Hwang, In Chang & Reynès, Frédéric & Tol, Richard S.J., 2017. "The effect of learning on climate policy under fat-tailed risk," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-18.
    5. Alex L. Marten, 2014. "The Role of Scenario Uncertainty in Estimating the Benefits of Carbon Mitigation," NCEE Working Paper Series 201404, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Mar 2014.
    6. Richard S.J. Tol, 2012. "Targets for Global Climate Policy: An Overview," Working Paper Series 3712, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    7. Stephen C. Newbold & Charles Griffiths & Chris Moore & Ann Wolverton & Elizabeth Kopits, 2013. "A Rapid Assessment Model For Understanding The Social Cost Of Carbon," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., pages 1-40.
    8. In Hwang & Frédéric Reynès & Richard Tol, 2013. "Climate Policy Under Fat-Tailed Risk: An Application of Dice," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 415-436.
    9. KEVIN DAYARATNA & ROSS McKITRICK & DAVID KREUTZER, 2017. "Empirically Constrained Climate Sensitivity And The Social Cost Of Carbon," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., pages 1-12.
    10. Louise Kessler, 2015. "Estimating the economic impact of the permafrost carbon feedback," GRI Working Papers 219, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    11. Kögel, Tomas, 2011. "The social cost of carbon on an optimal balanced growth path," Economics Discussion Papers 2011-35, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    12. In Chang Hwang, 2016. "Active learning and optimal climate policy," EcoMod2016 9611, EcoMod.
    13. Kopp, Robert E. & Mignone, Bryan K., 2012. "The US government's social cost of carbon estimates after their first two years: Pathways for improvement," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-41.
    14. Hwang, In Chang & Tol, Richard S.J. & Hofkes, Marjan W., 2016. "Fat-tailed risk about climate change and climate policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 25-35.

  3. Alex L. Marten & Stephen C. Newbold, 2011. "Estimating the Social Cost of Non-CO2 GHG Emissions: Methane and Nitrous Oxide," NCEE Working Paper Series 201101, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Feb 2011.

    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2015. "Selective reporting and the social cost of carbon," CAMA Working Papers 2015-28, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Richard S. J. Tol, 2015. "Economic impacts of climate change," Working Paper Series 7515, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    3. Liu, Wei & Yin, Yafeng & Yang, Hai, 2015. "Effectiveness of variable speed limits considering commuters’ long-term response," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 81(P2), pages 498-519.
    4. Marten, Alex L., 2011. "Transient temperature response modeling in IAMs: The effects of over simplification on the SCC," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 5, pages 1-42.
    5. Stephen C. Newbold & Charles Griffiths & Chris Moore & Ann Wolverton & Elizabeth Kopits, 2013. "A Rapid Assessment Model For Understanding The Social Cost Of Carbon," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., pages 1-40.
    6. Richardson, Leslie & Keefe, Kelly & Huber, Christopher & Racevskis, Laila & Reynolds, Gregg & Thourot, Scott & Miller, Ian, 2014. "Assessing the value of the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP) in Everglades restoration: An ecosystem service approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 366-377.
    7. Rhodes, Joshua D. & King, Carey & Gulen, Gürcan & Olmstead, Sheila M. & Dyer, James S. & Hebner, Robert E. & Beach, Fred C. & Edgar, Thomas F. & Webber, Michael E., 2017. "A geographically resolved method to estimate levelized power plant costs with environmental externalities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 491-499.
    8. Weyant John, 2014. "Integrated assessment of climate change: state of the literature," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 5(3), pages 377-409, December.
    9. Robert w. Hahn & Robert A. Ritz, 2013. "Does the social Cost of Carbon Matter?: An Assessment of U.S. Policy," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1346, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    10. Marcus C. Sarofim & Stephanie T. Waldhoff & Susan C. Anenberg, 2017. "Valuing the Ozone-Related Health Benefits of Methane Emission Controls," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 45-63.
    11. Aaheim, Asbjørn & Mideksa, Torben, 2017. "Requirements to metrics of greenhouse gas emissions, given a cap on temperature," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 460-467.
    12. Tichavska, Miluše & Tovar, Beatriz, 2015. "Environmental cost and eco-efficiency from vessel emissions in Las Palmas Port," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 126-140.
    13. Krupnick, Alan & Darmstadter, Joel & Richardson, Nathan & McLaughlin, Katrina, 2015. "Putting a Carbon Charge on Federal Coal: Legal and Economic Issues," Discussion Papers dp-15-13, Resources For the Future.

  4. Alex L. Marten & Christopher C. Moore, 2010. "An Options Based Bioeconomic Model for Biological and Chemical Control of Invasive Species," NCEE Working Paper Series 201006, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised May 2010.

    Cited by:

    1. Charles Sims & David Finnoff & Jason Shogren, 2016. "Bioeconomics of invasive species: using real options theory to integrate ecology, economics, and risk management," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 61-70, February.
    2. Dalmazzone, Silvana & Giaccaria, Sergio, 2014. "Economic drivers of biological invasions: A worldwide, bio-geographic analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 154-165.
    3. Sturla Kvamsdal & Diwakar Poudel & Leif Sandal, 2016. "Harvesting in a Fishery with Stochastic Growth and a Mean-Reverting Price," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 643-663.
    4. Fenichel, Eli P. & Horan, Richard D., 2016. "Tinbergen and tipping points: Could some thresholds be policy-induced?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PB), pages 137-152.
    5. Eli Fenichel & Timothy Richards & David Shanafelt, 2014. "The Control of Invasive Species on Private Property with Neighbor-to-Neighbor Spillovers," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 231-255.
    6. Sims, Charles & Finnoff, David, 2013. "When is a “wait and see” approach to invasive species justified?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 235-255.
    7. arnaud dragicevic, 2012. "Bayesian Population Dynamics of Spreading Species," THEMA Working Papers 2012-30, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    8. Davis, Rebecca J. & Sims, Charles, 2016. "To Frack or Not to Frack: Option Value Analysis on the U.S. Natural Gas Market," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235642, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Sims, Charles & Finnoff, David & O’Regan, Suzanne M., 2016. "Public control of rational and unpredictable epidemics," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PB), pages 161-176.

Articles

  1. Alex L. Marten & Elizabeth A. Kopits & Charles W. Griffiths & Stephen C. Newbold & Ann Wolverton, 2015. "Incremental CH 4 and N 2 O mitigation benefits consistent with the US Government's SC-CO 2 estimates," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 272-298, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Krupnick, Alan & Darmstadter, Joel & Richardson, Nathan & McLaughlin, Katrina, 2015. "Putting a Carbon Charge on Federal Coal: Legal and Economic Issues," Discussion Papers dp-15-13, Resources For the Future.

  2. Newbold, Stephen C. & Marten, Alex L., 2014. "The value of information for integrated assessment models of climate change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 111-123.

    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2015. "Selective reporting and the social cost of carbon," CAMA Working Papers 2015-28, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Ahlvik, Lassi & Hyytiäinen, Kari, 2015. "Value of adaptation in water protection — Economic impacts of uncertain climate change in the Baltic Sea," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 231-240.
    3. Howard, Peter H & Sterner, Thomas, 2016. "Few and Not So Far Between: A Meta-analysis of Climate Damage Estimates," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235696, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

  3. Elizabeth Kopits & Alex Marten & Ann Wolverton, 2014. "Incorporating 'catastrophic' climate change into policy analysis," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 637-664, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Yongyang Cai & Kenneth L. Judd & Thomas S. Lontzek, 2015. "The Social Cost of Carbon with Economic and Climate Risks," Papers 1504.06909, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2015.

  4. Alex Marten & Robert Kopp & Kate Shouse & Charles Griffiths & Elke Hodson & Elizabeth Kopits & Bryan Mignone & Chris Moore & Steve Newbold & Stephanie Waldhoff & Ann Wolverton, 2013. "Improving the assessment and valuation of climate change impacts for policy and regulatory analysis," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 433-438, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Stern, 2013. "The Structure of Economic Modeling of the Potential Impacts of Climate Change: Grafting Gross Underestimation of Risk onto Already Narrow Science Models," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 838-859, September.
    2. Gary Yohe & Chris Hope, 2013. "Some thoughts on the value added from a new round of climate change damage estimates," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 451-465, April.

  5. Marten, Alex L. & Newbold, Stephen C., 2012. "Estimating the social cost of non-CO2 GHG emissions: Methane and nitrous oxide," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 957-972.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Marten, Alex L. & Moore, Christopher C., 2011. "An options based bioeconomic model for biological and chemical control of invasive species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 2050-2061, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Marten, Alex L., 2011. "Transient temperature response modeling in IAMs: The effects of over simplification on the SCC," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 5, pages 1-42.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (3) 2011-02-12 2011-06-04 2013-01-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (3) 2011-02-12 2011-06-04 2013-01-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (2) 2011-02-12 2013-01-19. Author is listed

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