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Ingo Outes-Leon

Personal Details

First Name:Ingo
Middle Name:
Last Name:Outes-Leon
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pou46
https://sites.google.com/site/iwoutes/
Terminal Degree: Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE); Department of Economics; Oxford University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Oxford University

Oxford, United Kingdom
http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/

:

Manor Rd. Building, Oxford, OX1 3UQ
RePEc:edi:sfeixuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine & Sanchez, Alan & Escobal, Javier, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru: A Within-Sibling Investigation," Working Papers 2011-017, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
  2. Ingo Outes-Leon & Catherine Porter & Alan Sanchez, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru," Research Department Publications 4743, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  3. Alan Sánchez & Ingo Outes & Oswaldo Molina, 2010. "Psychosocial Status and Cognitive Achievement in Peru (Estado psicosocial y desarrollo cognitivo en el Perú)," Documentos de Trabajo (Niños del Milenio-GRADE) ninosm65, Niños del Milenio (Young Lives).

Articles

  1. Dercon, Stefan & Hill, Ruth Vargas & Clarke, Daniel & Outes-Leon, Ingo & Seyoum Taffesse, Alemayehu, 2014. "Offering rainfall insurance to informal insurance groups: Evidence from a field experiment in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 132-143.
  2. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine, 2013. "Catching up from early nutritional deficits? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 148-163.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine & Sanchez, Alan & Escobal, Javier, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru: A Within-Sibling Investigation," Working Papers 2011-017, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.

    Cited by:

    1. Florencia Lopez Boo & Maria E. Canon, 2012. "Richer but more unequal? nutrition and caste gaps," Working Papers 2012-051, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    2. Berhane, Guush & Abay, Mehari Hiluf & Woldehanna, Tassew, 2015. "Childhood shocks, safety nets and cognitive skills: Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Perkins, Jessica M. & Kim, Rockli & Krishna, Aditi & McGovern, Mark & Aguayo, Victor M. & Subramanian, S.V., 2017. "Understanding the association between stunting and child development in low- and middle-income countries: Next steps for research and intervention," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 193(C), pages 101-109.
    4. Castro, Juan F. & Rolleston, Caine, 2018. "The contribution of early childhood and schools to cognitive gaps: New evidence from Peru," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 144-164.
    5. Elisabetta Aurino & Francesco Burchi, 2017. "Children’s Multidimensional Health and Medium-Term Cognitive Skills in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 289-311, April.

  2. Ingo Outes-Leon & Catherine Porter & Alan Sanchez, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru," Research Department Publications 4743, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Florencia Lopez Boo & Maria E. Canon, 2012. "Richer but more unequal? nutrition and caste gaps," Working Papers 2012-051, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    2. Berhane, Guush & Abay, Mehari Hiluf & Woldehanna, Tassew, 2015. "Childhood shocks, safety nets and cognitive skills: Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Perkins, Jessica M. & Kim, Rockli & Krishna, Aditi & McGovern, Mark & Aguayo, Victor M. & Subramanian, S.V., 2017. "Understanding the association between stunting and child development in low- and middle-income countries: Next steps for research and intervention," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 193(C), pages 101-109.
    4. Castro, Juan F. & Rolleston, Caine, 2018. "The contribution of early childhood and schools to cognitive gaps: New evidence from Peru," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 144-164.
    5. Elisabetta Aurino & Francesco Burchi, 2017. "Children’s Multidimensional Health and Medium-Term Cognitive Skills in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 289-311, April.

  3. Alan Sánchez & Ingo Outes & Oswaldo Molina, 2010. "Psychosocial Status and Cognitive Achievement in Peru (Estado psicosocial y desarrollo cognitivo en el Perú)," Documentos de Trabajo (Niños del Milenio-GRADE) ninosm65, Niños del Milenio (Young Lives).

    Cited by:

    1. Ramlatu Attah & Valentina Barca & Andrew Kardan & Ian MacAuslan & Fred Merttens & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Can Social Protection Affect Psychosocial Wellbeing and Why Does This Matter? Lessons from Cash Transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(8), pages 1115-1131, August.
    2. Dercon, Stefan & Singh, Abhijeet, 2013. "From Nutrition to Aspirations and Self-Efficacy: Gender Bias over Time among Children in Four Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 31-50.

Articles

  1. Dercon, Stefan & Hill, Ruth Vargas & Clarke, Daniel & Outes-Leon, Ingo & Seyoum Taffesse, Alemayehu, 2014. "Offering rainfall insurance to informal insurance groups: Evidence from a field experiment in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 132-143.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael R. CARTER & Alain de JANVRY & Elisabeth SADOULET & Alexandros SARRIS, 2014. "Index-based weather insurance for developing countries: A review of evidence and a set of propositions for up-scaling," Working Papers P111, FERDI.
    2. Awel Y. & Azomahou T.T., 2015. "Risk preference or financial literacy? Behavioural experiment on index insurance demand," MERIT Working Papers 005, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Petraud, Jean & Boucher, Stephen & Carter, Michael, 2015. "Competing theories of risk preferences and the demand for crop insurance: Experimental evidence from Peru," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211383, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Hill, Ruth Vargas & Porter, Catherine, 2017. "Vulnerability to Drought and Food Price Shocks: Evidence from Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 65-77.
    5. Ceballos, Francisco, 2016. "Estimating spatial basis risk in rainfall index insurance: Methodology and application to excess rainfall insurance in Uruguay," IFPRI discussion papers 1595, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Aditya Kusuma & Ilan Noy & Bethanna Jackson, 2017. "A Viable and Cost-Effective Weather Index Insurance for Rice in Indonesia," CESifo Working Paper Series 6530, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Norton, Michael & Boucher, Stephen & Verteramo Chiu, Leslie, 2015. "Geostatistics, Basis Risk, and Index Insurance," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205755, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    8. Van Campenhout, Bjorn & Bizimungu, Emmanuel & Birungi, Dorothy, 2016. "Risk and sustainable crop intensification: The case of smallholder rice and potato farmers in Uganda:," IFPRI discussion papers 1521, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Renuka Sane & Susan Thomas, 2016. "From participation to repurchase: Low-income households and micro-insurance," Working Papers id:11133, eSocialSciences.
    10. Delavallade, Clara & Dizon, Felipe & Hill, Ruth Vargas & Petraud, Jean Paul, 2015. "Managing risk with insurance and savings: Experimental evidence for male and female farm managers in West Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1426, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Karlan, Dean S. & Osei, Robert & Osei-Akoto, Isaac & Udry, Christopher, 2012. "Agricultural Decisions after Relaxing Credit and Risk Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 9173, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Van Campenhout, Bjorn, 2016. "Risk and Sustainable Crop Intensification," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246917, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    13. Ward, Patrick S. & Spielman, David J. & Ortega, David L. & Kumar, Neha & Minocha, Sumedha, 2015. "Demand for complementary financial and technological tools for managing drought risk:," IFPRI discussion papers 1430, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Jensen, Nathaniel & Mude, Andrew & Barrett, Christopher, 2014. "How Basis Risk and Spatiotemporal Adverse Selection Influence Demand for Index Insurance: Evidence from Northern Kenya," MPRA Paper 60452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Hill, Ruth Vargas & Robles, Miguel, 2011. "Flexible insurance for heterogeneous farmers: Results from a small-scale pilot in Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1092, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Morsink,Karlijn & Clarke,Daniel Jonathan & Mapfumo,Shadreck, 2016. "How to measure whether index insurance provides reliable protection," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7744, The World Bank.
    17. Alain de JANVRY & Kyle EMERICK & Elisabeth SADOULET & Manzoor DAR, 2016. "The Agricultural Technology Adoption Puzzle: What Can We Learn From Field Experiments?," Working Papers P178, FERDI.
    18. Jensen, Nathaniel D. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Mude, Andrew G., 2014. "Basis Risk and the Welfare Gains from Index Insurance: Evidence from Northern Kenya," MPRA Paper 59153, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Mohor, Guilherme Samprogna & Mendiondo, Eduardo Mario, 2017. "Economic indicators of hydrologic drought insurance under water demand and climate change scenarios in a Brazilian context," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 66-78.
    20. Ward, Patrick S. & Spielman, David J. & Ortega, David L. & Kumar, Neha & Minocha, Sumedha, 2015. "Demand for Complementary Financial and Technological Tools for Managing Drought Risk: Evidence from Rice Farmers in Bangladesh," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 204882, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    21. Million Tadesse & Bekele Shiferaw & Olaf Erenstein, 2015. "Weather index insurance for managing drought risk in smallholder agriculture: lessons and policy implications for sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-21, December.
    22. Ayako Matsuda & Takashi Kurosaki, 2017. "Temperature and Rainfall Index Insurance in India," OSIPP Discussion Paper 17E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    23. Huo, Ran & Octavio, Ramirez, 2017. "Basis risk and welfare effect of weather index insurance for smallholders in China," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252816, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    24. Carter, Michael R. & Janzen, Sarah A., 2018. "Social protection in the face of climate change: targeting principles and financing mechanisms," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(03), pages 369-389, June.
    25. Glenn W. Harrison & Jia Min Ng, 2016. "Evaluating The Expected Welfare Gain From Insurance," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 83(1), pages 91-120, January.
    26. Sawada, Yasuyuki & Takasaki, Yoshito, 2017. "Natural Disaster, Poverty, and Development: An Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 2-15.
    27. Sibiko, Kenneth W. & Veettil, Prakashan C. & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Small Farmers’ Preferences for Weather Index Insurance: Insights from Kenya," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246399, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    28. Delavallade, Clara & Dizon, Felipe & Hill, Ruth Vargas & Petraud, Jean Paul, 2015. "Managing risk with insurance and savings : experimental evidence for male and female farm managers in the Sahel," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7176, The World Bank.
    29. Schleicher, Michael & Klonner, Stefan & Sauerborn, Rainer & Sié, Alie & Souares, Aurélia, 2018. "The Demand for Health Insurance in a Poor Economy: Evidence from Burkina Faso," Working Papers 0648, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    30. Jensen, Nathaniel D. & Mude, Andrew G. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2018. "How basis risk and spatiotemporal adverse selection influence demand for index insurance: Evidence from northern Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 172-198.
    31. Nigus, Halefom & Nillesen, Eleonora & Mohnen, Pierre, 2018. "The effect of weather index insurance on social capital: Experimental evidence from Ethiopia," MERIT Working Papers 007, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    32. Daniel J. Clarke, 2016. "A Theory of Rational Demand for Index Insurance," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 283-306, February.
    33. Kyle Emerick & Alain de Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Manzoor H. Dar, 2016. "Technological Innovations, Downside Risk, and the Modernization of Agriculture," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(6), pages 1537-1561, June.
    34. Shawn Cole & Daniel Stein & Jeremy Tobacman, 2014. "Dynamics of Demand for Index Insurance: Evidence from a Long-Run Field Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 284-290, May.
    35. Berhane, Guush & Dercon, Stefan & Hill, Ruth & Taffesse, Alemayehu, 2015. "Formal and informal insurance: experimental evidence from Ethiopia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211331, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    36. Platteau, Jean-Philippe & De Bock, Ombeline & Gelade, Wouter, 2017. "The Demand for Microinsurance: A Literature Review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 139-156.

  2. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine, 2013. "Catching up from early nutritional deficits? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 148-163.

    Cited by:

    1. Porter, Catherine & Goyal, Radhika, 2016. "Social protection for all ages? Impacts of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program on child nutrition," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 92-99.
    2. Gabriela Guerrero & Juan Leon & Kirrily Pells & Martin Woodhead, 2014. "Changing Children’s Lives Risks and Opportunities (Cambiando la vida de los niños)," Documentos de Trabajo (Niños del Milenio-GRADE) ninosmcambiandolavida, Niños del Milenio (Young Lives).
    3. Camelia Minoiu & Olga N. Shemyakina, 2012. "Armed conflict, household victimization, and child health in Côte d'Ivoire," Working Papers 245, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    4. Schott, Whitney B. & Crookston, Benjamin T. & Lundeen, Elizabeth A. & Stein, Aryeh D. & Behrman, Jere R., 2013. "Periods of child growth up to age 8 years in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam: Key distal household and community factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 278-287.
    5. Laura B. Nolan, 2016. "Rural–Urban Child Height for Age Trajectories and Their Heterogeneous Determinants in Four Developing Countries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(5), pages 599-629, October.
    6. Tiwari, Sailesh & Jacoby, Hanan G. & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2013. "Monsoon babies : rainfall shocks and child nutrition in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6395, The World Bank.
    7. Singh, Prakarsh & Masters, William A., 2016. "Behavior Change for Early Childhood Nutrition: Effectiveness of Health Worker Training Depends on Maternal Information in a Randomized Control Trial," IZA Discussion Papers 10375, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Himaz, Rozana, 2018. "Stunting later in childhood and outcomes as a young adult: Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 344-357.
    9. Bethelhem Debela & Gerald Shively & Stein Holden, 2015. "Does Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program improve child nutrition?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 7(6), pages 1273-1289, December.
    10. Kalle Hirvonen, 2013. "Measuring catch-up growth in malnourished populations," Working Paper Series 5913, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2011-12-19 2012-01-03. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2011-12-19. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2011-12-19. Author is listed

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