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Risk and Sustainable Crop Intensification

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Abstract

To feed a growing and increasingly urbanized population, Uganda needs to increase crop production without further exhausting available resources. Therefore, smallholders farmers are encouraged to adopt sustainable crop intensification methods such as inorganic fertilizer or hybrid seeds. However, these farmers perceive these new technologies as risky, hence adoption will depend on how well they can manage this additional risk. This article documents patterns observed in socio-economic data that suggest risk is an important barrier to sustainable crop intensification practices among Ugandan small-holder rice and potato farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Van Campenhout, Bjorn, 2016. "Risk and Sustainable Crop Intensification," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246917, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae16:246917
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/246917/files/252.%20Risk%20and%20intensification%20in%20Uganda.pdf
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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries; Environmental Economics and Policy; Risk and Uncertainty;

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