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A model of housing and credit cycles with imperfect market knowledge

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  • Kuang, Pei

Abstract

The paper presents a model of housing and credit cycles featuring distorted beliefs and comovement and mutual reinforcement between house price expectations and price developments via credit expansion/contraction. Positive (negative) development in house prices fuels optimism (pessimism) and credit expansion (contraction), which in turn boost (dampen) housing demand and house prices and reinforce agents׳ optimism (pessimism). Bayesian learning about house prices can endogenously generate self-reinforcing booms and busts in house prices and significantly strengthen the role of collateral constraints in aggregate fluctuations. The model can quantitatively account for the 2001–2008 U.S. boom-bust cycle in house prices and associated household debt and consumption dynamics. It also demonstrates that allowing for imperfect knowledge of agents, a higher leveraged economy is more prone to self-reinforcing fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Kuang, Pei, 2014. "A model of housing and credit cycles with imperfect market knowledge," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 419-437.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:70:y:2014:i:c:p:419-437
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2014.06.013
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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Pintus & Jacek Suda, 2019. "Learning Financial Shocks and the Great Recession," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 31, pages 123-146, January.
    2. Lambertini, Luisa & Mendicino, Caterina & Punzi, Maria Teresa, 2017. "Expectations-driven cycles in the housing market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 297-312.
    3. Pancrazi, Roberto & Pietrunti, Mario, 2019. "Natural expectations and home equity extraction," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C).
    4. Yongheng Deng & Eric Girardin & Roselyne Joyeux, 2015. "Fundamentals and the Volatility of Real Estate Prices in China: A Sequential Modelling Strategy," Working Papers 222015, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    5. Deng, Yongheng & Girardin, Eric & Joyeux, Roselyne, 2018. "Fundamentals and the volatility of real estate prices in China: A sequential modelling strategy," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 205-222.
    6. Martijn (M.I.) Droes & Boris Ziermans & Philip Koppels, 2017. "Information Asymmetry, Lease Incentives, and the Role of Advisors in the Market for Commercial Real Estate," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-106/IV, Tinbergen Institute.
    7. Pei Kuang & Tong Wang, 2017. "Labor Market Dynamics With Search Frictions And Fair Wage Considerations," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1336-1349, July.
    8. Martijn I. Dröes & Marc K. Francke, 2018. "What Causes the Positive Price-Turnover Correlation in European Housing Markets?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 57(4), pages 618-646, November.
    9. Pedro Gete, 2015. "Housing demands, savings gluts and current account dynamics," Globalization Institute Working Papers 221, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 01 Aug 2015.
    10. Kuang, Pei & Yao, Yao, 2017. "Are rational explosive solutions learnable?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 62-66.
    11. Mérő, Bence & Vágó, Nikolett, 2018. "Keresletvezérelt lakáspiaci modell a lakáshitelezést szabályozó makro prudenciális eszközök tanulmányozására [A demand-led model of the housing market for studying the macro-prudential means of reg," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 1115-1153.
    12. Pauline Gandré, 2020. "Learning, house prices and macro-financial linkages," EconomiX Working Papers 2020-10, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    13. Gandré, Pauline, 2020. "US stock prices and recency-biased learning in the run-up to the Global Financial Crisis and its aftermath," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 104(C).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Boom-bust; Collateral constraints; Learning; Leverage; Housing;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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