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Stock Market Volatility and Learning

  • Klaus Adam
  • Albert Marcet
  • Juan Pablo Nicolini

We study a standard consumption based asset pricing model with rationally investing agents but allow agents' prior beliefs about price and dividend behavior to deviate slightly from rational expectations priors. Learning about stock price behavior then causes the model to become quantitatively consistent with a range of basic asset prizing 'puzzles': stock returns display momentum and mean reversion, asset prices become volatile, the price-dividend ratio displays persistence, long-horizon returns become predictable and a risk premium emerges. Comparing the moments of the model with those in the data using confidence bands from the method of simulated moments, we show that our findings are robust to different assumptions on the system of beliefs and other model features. We depart from previous studies of asset prices under learning in that agents form expectations about future stock prices using past price observations.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1077.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1077
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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  1. Timmermann, Allan G, 1993. "How Learning in Financial Markets Generates Excess Volatility and Predictability in Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(4), pages 1135-45, November.
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  4. Fabrice Collard & Sujoy Mukerji & Kevin Sheppard & Jean-Marc Tallon, 2011. "Ambiguity and the historical equity premium," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 11032r, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, revised Aug 2012.
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  18. repec:cup:macdyn:v:5:y:2001:i:2:p:272-302 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Adam, Klaus, 2003. "Learning and Equilibrium Selection in a Monetary Overlapping Generations Model with Sticky Prices," CFS Working Paper Series 2003/03, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  20. Wiliam Branch & George W. Evans, . "Asset Return Dynamics and Learning," University of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers 2006-14, University of Oregon Economics Department.
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  37. Franklin Allen & Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2006. "Beauty Contests and Iterated Expectations in Asset Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 719-752.
  38. Fabrice Collard & Sujoy Mukerji & Kevin Sheppard & Jean-Marc Tallon, 2011. "Ambiguity and the historical equity premium," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00594096, HAL.
  39. Klaus Adam, 2001. "Learning and Equilibrium Selection in a Monetary Overlapping Generations Model with Sticky," CSEF Working Papers 69, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
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