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Do subjective expectations explain asset pricing puzzles?

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  • Bakshi, Gurdip
  • Skoulakis, Georgios

Abstract

The structural uncertainty model with Bayesian learning, advanced by Weitzman (AER 2007), provides a framework for gauging the effect of structural uncertainty on asset prices and risk premiums. This paper provides an operational version of this approach that incorporates realistic priors about consumption growth volatility, while guaranteeing finite asset pricing quantities. In contrast to the extant literature, the resulting asset pricing model with subjective expectations yields well-defined expected utility, finite moment generating function of the predictive distribution of consumption growth, and tractable expressions for equity premium and risk-free return. Our quantitative analysis reveals that explaining the historical equity premium and risk-free return, in the context of subjective expectations, requires implausible levels of structural uncertainty. Furthermore, these implausible prior beliefs result in consumption disaster probabilities that virtually coincide with those implied by more realistic priors. At the same time, the two sets of prior beliefs have diametrically opposite asset pricing implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Bakshi, Gurdip & Skoulakis, Georgios, 2010. "Do subjective expectations explain asset pricing puzzles?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(3), pages 462-477, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:98:y:2010:i:3:p:462-477
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:lan:wpaper:2360 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Koulovatianos, Christos & Wieland, Volker, 2011. "Asset pricing under rational learning about rare disasters," IMFS Working Paper Series 46, Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute for Monetary and Financial Stability (IMFS).
    3. Michael Johannes & Lars Lochstoer & Pierre Collin-Dufresne, 2015. "Parameter Learning in General Equilibrium: The Asset Pricing Implications," 2015 Meeting Papers 647, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. T M Niguez & I Paya & D Peel & J Perote, 2011. "On the stability of the CRRA utility under high degrees of uncertainty," Working Papers 615773, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    5. Michael Johannes & Arthur Korteweg & Nicholas Polson, 2014. "Sequential Learning, Predictability, and Optimal Portfolio Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(2), pages 611-644, April.
    6. Pierre Collin-Dufresne & Michael Johannes & Lars A. Lochstoer, 2013. "Parameter Learning in General Equilibrium: The Asset Pricing Implications," NBER Working Papers 19705, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Pierre Collin-Dufresne & Michael Johannes & Lars A. Lochstoer, 2016. "Parameter Learning in General Equilibrium: The Asset Pricing Implications," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(3), pages 664-698, March.
    8. Yiqun Mou & Lars A. Lochstoer & Michael Johannes, 2011. "Learning about Consumption Dynamics," 2011 Meeting Papers 306, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Ñíguez, Trino-Manuel & Paya, Ivan & Peel, David & Perote, Javier, 2012. "On the stability of the constant relative risk aversion (CRRA) utility under high degrees of uncertainty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 244-248.
    10. repec:lan:wpaper:2585 is not listed on IDEAS

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