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Booms and Busts in Asset Prices

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  • Klaus Adam
  • Albert Marcet

Abstract

We show how low-frequency boom and bust cycles in asset prices can emerge from Bayesian learning by investors. Investors rationally maximize infinite horizon utility but hold subjective priors about the asset return process that we allow to differ infinitesimally from the rational expectations prior. Bayesian updating of return beliefs then gives rise to selfreinforcing return optimism that results in an asset price boom. The boom endogenously comes to an end because return optimism causes investors to make optimistic plans about future consumption. The latter reduces the demand for assets that allow to intertemporally transfer resources. Once returns fall short of expectations, investors revise return expectations downward and set in motion a self-reinforcing price bust. In line with available survey data, the learning model predicts return optimism to comove positively with market valuation. In addition, the learning model replicates the low frequency behavior of the U.S. price dividend ratio over the period 1926-2006.

Suggested Citation

  • Klaus Adam & Albert Marcet, 2011. "Booms and Busts in Asset Prices," CEP Discussion Papers dp1059, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1059
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Riots, sell-offs & cascades
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2011-08-09 18:59:23

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Adam & Pei Kuang & Albert Marcet, 2012. "House Price Booms and the Current Account," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(1), pages 77-122.
    2. Pei Kuang, 2013. "Imperfect Knowledge About Asset Prices and Credit Cycles," Discussion Papers 13-02, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    3. Koulovatianos, Christos & Wieland, Volker, 2011. "Asset pricing under rational learning about rare disasters," IMFS Working Paper Series 46, Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute for Monetary and Financial Stability (IMFS).
    4. Klaus Adam & Albert Marcet & Juan Pablo Nicolini, 2016. "Stock Market Volatility and Learning," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(1), pages 33-82, February.
    5. Adam, Klaus & Marcet, Albert, 2011. "Internal rationality, imperfect market knowledge and asset prices," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(3), pages 1224-1252, May.
    6. Caines, Colin, 2020. "Can learning explain boom-bust cycles in asset prices? An application to the US housing boom," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C).
    7. Scheffknecht, Lukas & Geiger, Felix, 2011. "A behavioral macroeconomic model with endogenous boom-bust cycles and leverage dynamcis," FZID Discussion Papers 37-2011, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    8. Andreas Fuster & Benjamin Hebert & David Laibson, 2012. "Natural Expectations, Macroeconomic Dynamics, and Asset Pricing," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(1), pages 1-48.
    9. Bennani, T. & Després, M. & Dujardin, M. & Duprey, T. & Kelber, A., 2014. "Macroprudential framework:key questions applied to the French case," Occasional papers 9, Banque de France.
    10. Enders, Zeno & Hakenes, Hendrik Hakenes, 2014. "On the Existence and Prevention of Speculative Bubbles," Working Papers 0567, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    11. Hommes, Cars & Zhu, Mei, 2014. "Behavioral learning equilibria," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 778-814.
    12. Broer, Tobias & Kero, Afroditi, 2011. "Great Moderation or Great Mistake: Can rising confidence in low macro-risk explain the boom in asset prices?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8700, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Pei Kuang, 2013. "Imperfect Knowledge About Asset Prices and Credit Cycles," Discussion Papers 13-02r, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    14. Sögner, Leopold, 2015. "Learning, convergence and economic constraints," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 27-43.
    15. Blake LeBaron, 2010. "Heterogeneous Gain Learning and Long Swings in Asset Prices," Working Papers 10, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    16. Alessandro Spelta & Guido Ascari & Nicolò Pecora, 2012. "Boom and Burst in Housing Market with Heterogeneous Agents," Quaderni di Dipartimento 177, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    17. Semmler, Willi & Bernard, Lucas, 2012. "Boom–bust cycles: Leveraging, complex securities, and asset prices," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 442-465.
    18. Benhima, Kenza, 2019. "Booms and busts with dispersed information," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 32-47.
    19. Sophie van Huellen, 2013. "Price Non-Convergence in Commodities: A Case Study of the Wheat Conundrum," Working Papers 185, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    20. Volha Audzei, 2015. "Information Acquisition and Excessive Risk: Impact of Policy Rate and Market Volatility," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp536, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    21. Pei Kuang, 2013. "Imperfect Knowledge about Asset Prices and Credit Cycles," CDMA Working Paper Series 201303, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    asset price fluctuations; boom and bust cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations

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