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Trend growth expectations and US house prices before and after the crisis

  • Hoffmann, Mathias
  • Krause, Michael U.
  • Laubach, Thomas

We provide an analysis that might help distinguish rationally justified movements in house prices from potentially non-rational movements, using a two-sector business cycle model, in which investment in housing is subject to collateral constraints. A large portion of the evolution of U.S. house prices during the past 20 years can be reproduced when expectations of future income growth as published in surveys are used as an input into the model. Changes in growth expectations translate into corresponding changes in house prices, since the value of housing must be linked to expected aggregate income. Only since about 2005 do actual and model-implied house prices clearly diverge, calling for explanations not based on economic fundamentals.

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Paper provided by Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre in its series Discussion Papers with number 12/2012.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:bubdps:122012
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  1. Davis, Morris & Heathcote, Jonathan, 2001. "Housing and the Business Cycle," Working Papers 01-09, Duke University, Department of Economics.
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  8. Hoffmann, Mathias & Krause, Michael & Laubach, Thomas, 2011. "Long-run growth expectations and 'global imbalances'," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,01, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  9. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Kahn, Charles M, 1980. "The Solution of Linear Difference Models under Rational Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1305-11, July.
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  17. Sims, Christopher A, 2002. "Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 1-20, October.
  18. Rochelle M. Edge & Thomas Laubach & John C. Williams, 2004. "Learning and shifts in long-run productivity growth," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-21, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  19. James MacGee, 2009. "Why didn’t Canada’s housing market go bust?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Sep.
  20. Benjamin J. Keys & Tanmoy Mukherjee & Amit Seru & Vikrant Vig, 2010. "Did Securitization Lead to Lax Screening? Evidence from Subprime Loans," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(1), pages 307-362, February.
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