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A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance

Author

Listed:
  • John Cullinan

    (National University of Ireland, Galway)

  • Kevin Denny

    (University College Dublin)

  • Darragh Flannery

    (University of Limerick)

Abstract

We examine the relationship between the distribution of upper secondary school performance and a range of individual and school level characteristics using unconditional quantile regression methods and data from Ireland. We find that determinants such as social class, maternal unemployment, extra private tuition, and working part-time have differential effects for low and high ability students and that important insights are lost by focusing on the conditional mean. The implication is that while certain factors can impact on whether or not a student is likely to proceed to higher education, other factors may affect where students go and what they study.

Suggested Citation

  • John Cullinan & Kevin Denny & Darragh Flannery, 2018. "A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance," Working Papers 201808, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201808
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201808.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Secondary school performance; Distribution; Unconditional quantile regression; Ireland;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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