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Long-term effects of school size on students’ outcomes

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  • Humlum, Maria Knoth
  • Smith, Nina

Abstract

We estimate the effect of school size on students’ long-term outcomes such as high school completion, being out of the labor market, and earnings at the age of 30. We use rich register data on the entire population of Danish children attending grade 9 in the period 1986–2004. This allows us to compare the results of different fixed effect and instrumental variables estimators. We use the natural population variation in the residential catchment areas and school openings and closures to instrument for actual school size. We find a robust positive but numerically fairly small relationship between school size and alternative measures of long-term success in the educational system and the labor market. The positive impact of school size seems mainly to be driven by boys and students from families with a low educational level.

Suggested Citation

  • Humlum, Maria Knoth & Smith, Nina, 2015. "Long-term effects of school size on students’ outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 28-43.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:45:y:2015:i:c:p:28-43
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.01.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Cullinan & Kevin Denny & Darragh Flannery, 2018. "A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance," Working Papers 201808, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    2. Beuchert, Louise & Humlum, Maria Knoth & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Smith, Nina, 2018. "The short-term effects of school consolidation on student achievement: Evidence of disruption?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 31-47.
    3. Karen Jeong Robinson & Josipa Roksa, 2016. "Counselors, Information, and High School College-Going Culture: Inequalities in the College Application Process," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(7), pages 845-868, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School size; High school graduation; Student outcomes; Educational economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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