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Should schools be smaller? The size-performance relationship for Welsh schools

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  • Foreman-Peck, James
  • Foreman-Peck, Lorraine

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  • Foreman-Peck, James & Foreman-Peck, Lorraine, 2006. "Should schools be smaller? The size-performance relationship for Welsh schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 157-171, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:25:y:2006:i:2:p:157-171
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leslie Rosenthal, 2003. "The Value of Secondary School Quality," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(3), pages 329-355, July.
    2. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "Does Competition among Public Schools Benefit Students and Taxpayers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1209-1238, December.
    3. John Sawkins, 2002. "Examination performance in Scottish secondary schools: an ordered logit approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(16), pages 2031-2041.
    4. Christian Dustmann & Najma Rajah & Arthur van Soest, 2003. "Class Size, Education, and Wages," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 99-120, February.
    5. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement: New Evidence from Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285.
    6. Bradley, Steve, et al, 2000. " Testing for Quasi-Market Forces in Secondary Education," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(3), pages 357-390, July.
    7. Andrews, Matthew & Duncombe, William & Yinger, John, 2002. "Revisiting economies of size in American education: are we any closer to a consensus?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 245-262, June.
    8. Edward P. Lazear, 2001. "Educational Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(3), pages 777-803.
    9. repec:lan:wpaper:1016 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:lan:wpaper:1092 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Adnett, Nick & Bougheas, Spiros & Davies, Peter, 2002. "Market-based reforms of public schooling: some unpleasant dynamics," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 323-330, August.
    12. Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2004. "High School Graduation in Australia: Do Schools Matter?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(2), pages 194-208, May.
    13. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
    14. repec:lan:wpaper:1015 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. John Cullinan & Kevin Denny & Darragh Flannery, 2018. "A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance," Working Papers 201808, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    2. Kempkes, Gerhard, 2010. "Rapid demographic change and the allocation of public education resources: Evidence from East Germany," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2010,16, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    3. Humlum, Maria Knoth & Smith, Nina, 2015. "Long-term effects of school size on students’ outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 28-43.
    4. Walsh, Patrick, 2010. "Is parental involvement lower at larger schools?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 959-970, December.
    5. McMullen, Steven C. & Rouse, Kathryn E., 2012. "School crowding, year-round schooling, and mobile classroom use: Evidence from North Carolina," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 812-823.
    6. Stiefel, Leanna & Schwartz, Amy Ellen & Iatarola, Patrice & Chellman, Colin C., 2009. "Mission matters: The cost of small high schools revisited," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 585-599, October.
    7. Jones, John T. & Toma, Eugenia F. & Zimmer, Ron W., 2008. "School attendance and district and school size," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 140-148, April.
    8. Laura M Crispin, 2016. "School Size and Student Achievement: Does One Size Fit All?," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 630-662, September.
    9. Hédi Essid & Pierre Ouellette & Stéphane Vigeant, 2013. "Small is not that beautiful after all: measuring the scale efficiency of Tunisian high schools using a DEA-bootstrap method," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(9), pages 1109-1120, March.

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