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High School Graduation in Australia: Do Schools Matter?

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  • Anh T. Le
  • Paul W. Miller

Abstract

This study examines the determinants of high school graduation in Australia. It uses two main approaches to estimation. The first of these is a conventional probit model based on a range of family background and demographic variables. This approach is then extended through consideration of a random parameters probit model. The results show that schools matter to the chances of completing high school in Australia. However, the school effects seem to have more to do with the selection of more able students with superior socioeconomic backgrounds than with the independent creation of favourable school or classroom climates. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2004. "High School Graduation in Australia: Do Schools Matter?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(2), pages 194-208, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:51:y:2004:i:2:p:194-208
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Giles, Margaret & Le, Anh T., 2009. "Investment in Human Capital during Incarceration and Employment Prospects of Prisoners," IZA Discussion Papers 4582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Foreman-Peck, James & Foreman-Peck, Lorraine, 2006. "Should schools be smaller? The size-performance relationship for Welsh schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 157-171, April.
    3. Brendan Houng & Moshe Justman, 2015. "Out-Of-Sample Predictions Of Access To Higher Education And School Value-Added," Working Papers 1511, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.

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