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The Role of Credit Constraints in Educational Choices: Evidence from NCDS and BCS70

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  • Lorraine Dearden
  • Leslie McGranahan
  • Barbara Sianesi

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Lorraine Dearden & Leslie McGranahan & Barbara Sianesi, 2004. "The Role of Credit Constraints in Educational Choices: Evidence from NCDS and BCS70," CEE Discussion Papers 0048, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0048
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2004. "Educational Inequality and the Expansion of UK Higher Education," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, pages 230-249.
    2. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Educational Inequality and The Expansion of UK Higher Education," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, pages 578-596.
    3. Lorraine Dearden & Leslie McGranahan & Leslie McGranahan & Barbara Sianesi, 2004. "Returns to Education for the Marginal Learner: Evidence from the BCS70," CEE Discussion Papers 0045, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    4. Jo Blanden & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Educational Inequality and The Expansion of UK Higher Education," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, pages 578-596.
    5. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Cigno, 2010. "How to Avoid a Pension Crisis: A Question of Intelligent System Design ," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, pages 21-37.
    2. Denny, Kevin & Doyle, Orla & McMullin, Patricia & O'Sullivan, Vincent, 2014. "Money, mentoring and making friends: The impact of a multidimensional access program on student performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 167-182.
    3. Mario Fiorini, 2012. "Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue Of Timing," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 741-772, August.
    4. Giovanni Caggiano & Efrem Castelnuovo & Valentina Colombo & Gabriela Nodari, 2015. "Estimating Fiscal Multipliers: News From A Non‐linear World," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(584), pages 746-776, May.
    5. Stephen Gibbons & Stephen Machin & Olmo Silva, 2008. "Choice, Competition, and Pupil Achievement," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, pages 912-947.
    6. Nathalie Chusseau & Joël Hellier & Bassem Ben-Halima, 2012. "Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality," Working Papers hal-00993472, HAL.
    7. Kevin Denny, 2005. "Do teachers make better parents? The differential performance of teachers’ children at school," Working Papers 200505, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    8. Beraldo, Sergio & Montolio, Daniel & Turati, Gilberto, 2009. "Healthy, educated and wealthy: A primer on the impact of public and private welfare expenditures on economic growth," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 946-956, December.
    9. Sandra Nieto Viramontes & Raul Ramos Lobo, 2011. "¿La sobreeducación de los padres afecta al rendimiento académico de sus hijos?," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 11, pages 185-206 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    10. Simon Burgess & Marcela Umaña-Aponte, 2011. "Raising your sights: the impact of friendship networks on educational aspirations," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/271, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    11. Jake Anders, 2012. "What's the link between household income and going to university?," DoQSS Working Papers 12-01, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    12. Meghir, Costas & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2011. "Earnings, Consumption and Life Cycle Choices," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    13. Mariana Alfonso, 2009. "Credit Constraints and the Demand for Higher Education in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2526, Inter-American Development Bank.
    14. Haroon Chowdry & Claire Crawford & Lorraine Dearden & Alissa Goodman & Anna Vignoles, 2013. "Widening participation in higher education: analysis using linked administrative data," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(2), pages 431-457, February.
    15. Nathalie Chusseau & Joel Hellier, 2012. "Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality," Working Papers 261, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    16. Vandenberghe, Vincent, 2007. "Family income and tertiary education attendance across the EU: an empirical assessment using sibling data," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6214, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    17. Javier Valbuena, 2012. "A Longitudinal Perspective on Higher Education Participation in the UK," Studies in Economics 1215, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    18. Christoph Moser & Robert Grundke, 2014. "Hidden Protectionism? Evidence from Non-tariff Barriers to Trade in the United States," KOF Working papers 14-369, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    19. Mariana Alfonso, 2009. "Credit Constraints and the Demand for Higher Education in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9314, Inter-American Development Bank.
    20. Vincent Vandenberghe, 2007. "Family Income and Tertiary Education Attendance across the EU: An empirical assessment using sibling data," CASE Papers case123, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    21. Anderberg, Dan, 2013. "Post-compulsory education: Participation and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, pages 134-150.
    22. Cathleen Johnson & Claude Montmarquette, 2011. "Loan Aversion among Canadian High School Students," CIRANO Working Papers 2011s-67, CIRANO.

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    Keywords

    Education;

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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