IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/tri/wpaper/1405.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Non-Linear Exchange Rate Relationships: An Automated Model Selection Approach with Indicator Saturation

Author

Listed:
  • Josh R. Stillwagon

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

Abstract

This paper examines whether the explanatory power of exchange rate models can be improved by allowing for cross-country asymmetries and non-linear effects of fundamentals. Both appear to be crucial. The data set looks at the USD versus pound and yen exchange rates from 1982:07-2012:02, and bias-corrected automated model selection is conducted with indicator saturation. Several non-linear effects are significant at the 1% level including for exchange rate momentum and Taylor rule effects of fundamentals. In many cases, larger changes in fundamentals lead to changes in the exchange rate at an increasing rate. Additionally, most of the indicators present in the linear models are eliminated once allowing for non-linearities, suggesting some of the structural breaks and outliers found in previous work were an artifact of the misspecified linear functional form.

Suggested Citation

  • Josh R. Stillwagon, 2014. "Non-Linear Exchange Rate Relationships: An Automated Model Selection Approach with Indicator Saturation," Working Papers 1405, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1405
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://internet2.trincoll.edu/repec/WorkingPapers2014/WP14-05.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2014
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul De Grauwe & Isabel Vansteenkiste, 2007. "Exchange rates and fundamentals: a non-linear relationship?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 37-54.
    2. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie D. Chinn & Ian W. Marsh, 2004. "How do UK-based foreign exchange dealers think their market operates?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 289-306.
    3. Dominguez, Kathryn M.E. & Panthaki, Freyan, 2006. "What defines `news' in foreign exchange markets?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 168-198, February.
    4. Castle, Jennifer L. & Hendry, David F., 2009. "The long-run determinants of UK wages, 1860-2004," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 5-28, March.
    5. Roman Frydman & Michael D. Goldberg, 2001. "Macroeconomic Fundamentals and the DM/$ Exchange Rate: Temporal Instability and the Monetary Model," Working Papers 50, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    6. Beckmann, Joscha & Belke, Ansgar & Dobnik, Frauke, 2012. "Cross-section dependence and the monetary exchange rate model – A panel analysis," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 38-53.
    7. Richard H. Clarida & Daniel Waldman, 2008. "Is Bad News About Inflation Good News for the Exchange Rate? And, If So, Can That Tell Us Anything about the Conduct of Monetary Policy?," NBER Chapters,in: Asset Prices and Monetary Policy, pages 371-396 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Charles Engel & Nelson C. Mark & Kenneth D. West, 2008. "Exchange Rate Models Are Not As Bad As You Think," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2007, Volume 22, pages 381-441 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Joscha Beckmann & Ansgar Belke & Michael Kühl, 2011. "The dollar-euro exchange rate and macroeconomic fundamentals: a time-varying coefficient approach," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 147(1), pages 11-40, April.
    10. Jennifer L. Castle & Jurgen A. Doornik & David F. Hendry & Felix Pretis, 2015. "Detecting Location Shifts during Model Selection by Step-Indicator Saturation," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(2), pages 1-25, April.
    11. Kevin D. Hoover & Stephen J. Perez, 1999. "Data mining reconsidered: encompassing and the general-to-specific approach to specification search," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 2(2), pages 167-191.
    12. David F. Hendry & Hans-Martin Krolzig, 2005. "The Properties of Automatic "GETS" Modelling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 32-61, March.
    13. Schulmeister, Stephan, 2006. "The interaction between technical currency trading and exchange rate fluctuations," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 212-233, September.
    14. Kilian, Lutz & Taylor, Mark P., 2003. "Why is it so difficult to beat the random walk forecast of exchange rates?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 85-107, May.
    15. Goldberg, Michael D & Frydman, Roman, 2001. "Macroeconomic Fundamentals and the DM/$ Exchange Rate: Temporal Instability and the Monetary Model," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 421-435, October.
    16. Henrik Hansen & Søren Johansen, 1999. "Some tests for parameter constancy in cointegrated VAR-models," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 2(2), pages 306-333.
    17. Joscha Beckmann & Ansgar Belke & Robert Czudaj, 2015. "Productivity Shocks and Real Effective Exchange Rates," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 502-515, August.
    18. Godfrey, Leslie G, 1978. "Testing for Higher Order Serial Correlation in Regression Equations When the Regressors Include Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1303-1310, November.
    19. Frommel, Michael & MacDonald, Ronald & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2005. "Markov switching regimes in a monetary exchange rate model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 485-502, May.
    20. David F. Hendry & Hans-Martin Krolzig, 2004. "We Ran One Regression," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(5), pages 799-810, December.
    21. David F. Hendry & Hans-Martin Krolzig, 2004. "We Ran One Regression," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(5), pages 799-810, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Afees A. Salisu & Umar B. Ndako, 2017. "Modelling stock price-exchange rate nexus in OECD countries - A new perspective," Working Papers 038, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    2. repec:eee:ecofin:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:584-596 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Roman Frydman & Joshua R. Stillwagon, 2016. "Stock-Market Expectations: Econometric Evidence that both REH and Behavioral Insights Matter," Working Papers Series 44, Institute for New Economic Thinking.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange Rates; determination puzzle; non-linearities; cross-country asymmetries; automated model selection; indicator saturation;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1405. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joshua Stillwagon). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edtrius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.