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Peace, Prosperity, and Pro-Growth Entrepreneurship


  • Wim Naudé


Support for entrepreneurship is widely seen as a mechanism to facilitate prosperity and peace in a growing number of post-conflict states. In this paper they critically evaluate this view. They argue that entrepreneurship is a ubiquitous quality in post-conflict states but not necessarily always for the good. Unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship may inhibit the resurgence of the private sector and might even cause a relapse into conflict. To limit unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship there are at least six dimensions which need to be taken into consideration, namely: the context of war, the relationship between institutions and entrepreneurship, the role played by ethnic/immigrant (minority) entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs in diaspora, the scope of the market, human and financial capital requirements, and appropriate forms of government support. Further research on entrepreneurship in post-conflict states is needed to overcome the current lack of data, which constrains policy design. [Discussion Paper No. 2007/02]

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  • Wim Naudé, 2010. "Peace, Prosperity, and Pro-Growth Entrepreneurship," Working Papers id:3001, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3001 Note: Institutional Papers

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    Cited by:

    1. Kanothi, R.N., 2009. "The dynamics of entrepreneurship in ICT: case of mobile phones downstream services in Kenya," ISS Working Papers - General Series 18727, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    2. Aliye Ahu Gülümser & Tüzın Baycan-Levent & Peter Nijkamp, 2009. "Measuring Regional Creative Capacity: A Literature Review for Rural-Specific Approaches," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 545-563, October.
    3. Niranjan Chipalkatti & Jonathan P. Doh & Meenakshi Rishi, 2011. "Institutional quality, knowledge spillovers and entrepreneurship," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(4), pages 307-329.

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    entrepreneurship; peace; security; reconstruction; development;

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