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Resolving the Missing Deflation Puzzle

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  • Lindé, Jesper
  • Trabandt, Mathias

Abstract

We propose a resolution of the missing deflation puzzle. Our resolution stresses the importance of nonlinearities in price- and wage-setting when the economy is exposed to large shocks. We show that a nonlinear macroeconomic model with real rigidities resolves the missing deflation puzzle, while a linearized version of the same underlying nonlinear model fails to do so. In addition, our nonlinear model reproduces the skewness of inflation and other macroeconomic variables observed in post-war U.S. data. All told, our results caution against the common practice of using linearized models to study inflation and output dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindé, Jesper & Trabandt, Mathias, 2019. "Resolving the Missing Deflation Puzzle," CEPR Discussion Papers 13690, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13690
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    great recession; inflation dynamics; linearized model solution; liquidity trap; nonlinear model solution; Real rigidities; strategic complementarities; zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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