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Rong Hai

Personal Details

First Name:Rong
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hai
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha846
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/ronghaiecon/home

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Business
University of Miami

Coral Gables, Florida (United States)
http://www.bus.miami.edu/thought-leadership/academic-departments/economics/

(305) 284-5540
(305) 284-2985
P.O. Box 248126, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6550
RePEc:edi:demiaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. James Heckman & Rong Hai, 2017. "Online Appendix to "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints"," Online Appendices 16-104, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  2. Rong Hai & James J. Heckman, 2016. "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints," NBER Working Papers 22999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Rong Hai & Dirk Krueger & Andrew Postlewaite, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuationsin the Presence of Memorable Goods," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-046, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  4. Rong Hai, 2013. "The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages: An Equilibrium Model of Workers' Compensation and Health Care Policies," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-019, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  5. Rong Hai, 2013. "The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-071, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 21 Dec 2013.
  6. Rong Hai & Andrew Postlewaite & Dirk Krueger, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuations in the Presence of Memorable Goods, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-012, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 15 Apr 2014.

Articles

  1. Siddhartha Biswas & Indraneel Chakraborty & Rong Hai, 2017. "Income Inequality, Tax Policy, and Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(601), pages 688-727, May.
  2. Chakraborty, Indraneel & Hai, Rong & Holter, Hans A. & Stepanchuk, Serhiy, 2017. "The real effects of financial (dis)integration: A multi-country equilibrium analysis of Europe," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 28-45.
  3. Rong Hai & James Heckman, 2017. "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 4-36, April.

    RePEc:oup:econjl:v:127:y:2017:i:601:p:688-727. is not listed on IDEAS

Software components

  1. James Heckman & Rong Hai, 2017. "Code and data files for "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints"," Computer Codes 16-104, Review of Economic Dynamics.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rong Hai & Dirk Krueger & Andrew Postlewaite, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuationsin the Presence of Memorable Goods," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-046, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Memorable goods
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-10-15 19:45:00

Working papers

  1. James Heckman & Rong Hai, 2017. "Online Appendix to "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints"," Online Appendices 16-104, Review of Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. He, Qichun, 2018. "Inflation and innovation with a cash-in-advance constraint on human capital accumulation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 14-18.
    2. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Itay Saporta-Eksten, 2015. "Children, time allocation and consumption insurance," IFS Working Papers W15/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Christian Belzil & Arnaud Maurel & Modibo Sidibé, 2017. "Estimating the Value of Higher Education Financial Aid: Evidence from a Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23641, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Christian Belzil & Jörgen Hansen, 2020. "The Evolution of the US Family Income-Schooling Relationship and Educational Selectivity," CIRANO Working Papers 2020s-35, CIRANO.
    5. C. Aina & D. Sonedda, 2018. "Investment in education and household consumption," Working Paper CRENoS 201806, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    6. Salvador Navarro & Jin Zhou, 2017. "Identifying Agent's Information Sets: an Application to a Lifecycle Model of Schooling, Consumption, and Labor Supply," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 58-92, April.
    7. Sunha Myong & Jungho Lee, 2019. "Self-financing, Parental Transfer, and College Education," 2019 Meeting Papers 106, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Alina Malkova & Klara Sabirianova Peter & Jan Svejnar, 2021. "Labor Informality and Credit Market Accessibility," Papers 2102.05803, arXiv.org.
    9. Heejeong Kim, . "Education, Wage Dynamics, and Wealth Inequality," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Rafael Carranza, 2020. "Inequality of Outcomes, Inequality of Opportunity, and Economic Growth," Working Papers 534, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

  2. Rong Hai & James J. Heckman, 2016. "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints," NBER Working Papers 22999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. He, Qichun, 2018. "Inflation and innovation with a cash-in-advance constraint on human capital accumulation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 14-18.
    2. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Itay Saporta-Eksten, 2015. "Children, time allocation and consumption insurance," IFS Working Papers W15/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Christian Belzil & Arnaud Maurel & Modibo Sidibé, 2017. "Estimating the Value of Higher Education Financial Aid: Evidence from a Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23641, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Christian Belzil & Jörgen Hansen, 2020. "The Evolution of the US Family Income-Schooling Relationship and Educational Selectivity," CIRANO Working Papers 2020s-35, CIRANO.
    5. C. Aina & D. Sonedda, 2018. "Investment in education and household consumption," Working Paper CRENoS 201806, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    6. Salvador Navarro & Jin Zhou, 2017. "Identifying Agent's Information Sets: an Application to a Lifecycle Model of Schooling, Consumption, and Labor Supply," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 58-92, April.
    7. Sunha Myong & Jungho Lee, 2019. "Self-financing, Parental Transfer, and College Education," 2019 Meeting Papers 106, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Alina Malkova & Klara Sabirianova Peter & Jan Svejnar, 2021. "Labor Informality and Credit Market Accessibility," Papers 2102.05803, arXiv.org.
    9. Heejeong Kim, . "Education, Wage Dynamics, and Wealth Inequality," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Rafael Carranza, 2020. "Inequality of Outcomes, Inequality of Opportunity, and Economic Growth," Working Papers 534, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

  3. Rong Hai & Dirk Krueger & Andrew Postlewaite, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuationsin the Presence of Memorable Goods," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-046, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

    Cited by:

    1. Stan Miles & Peter Smoczynski, 2016. "Optimal Intertemporal Consumption and Involuntary Memories of Consumption," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 251-273, September.
    2. Peter Ganong & Damon Jones & Pascal Noel & Diana Farrell & Fiona Greig & Chris Wheat, 2020. "Wealth, Race, and Consumption Smoothing of Typical Income Shocks," Working Papers 2020-49, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    3. Keshav Dogra & Olga Gorbachev, 2015. "Consumption Volatility, Liquidity Constraints and Household Welfare," Working Papers 15-05, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    4. Carroll, Christopher D. & Slacalek, Jiri & White, Matthew N. & Crawley, Edmund S., 2020. "Modeling the consumption response to the CARES Act," Working Paper Series 2441, European Central Bank.
    5. Gabriela Prelipcean & Mircea Boscoianu, 2014. "Stochastic Dynamic Model on the Consumption – Saving Decision for Adjusting Products and Services Supply According with Consumers` Attainability," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(35), pages 201-201, February.

  4. Rong Hai & Andrew Postlewaite & Dirk Krueger, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuations in the Presence of Memorable Goods, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-012, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 15 Apr 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Itzhak Gilboa & Andrew Postlewaite & Larry Samuelson, 2015. "Memory Utility," PIER Working Paper Archive 15-005, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. Itzhak Gilboa & Andrew Postlewaite & Larry Samuelson, 2016. "Memorable Consumption," PIER Working Paper Archive 16-003, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Feb 2016.
    3. Bao, Te & Dai, Yun & Yu, Xiaohua, 2018. "Memory and discounting: Theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 21-30.

Articles

  1. Siddhartha Biswas & Indraneel Chakraborty & Rong Hai, 2017. "Income Inequality, Tax Policy, and Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(601), pages 688-727, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Howarth, David & Marteau, Theresa M. & Coutts, Adam P. & Huppert, Julian L. & Pinto, Pedro Ramos, 2019. "What do the British public think of inequality in health, wealth, and power?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 222(C), pages 198-206.
    2. Adnen Ben Nasr & Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta & Seyi Saint Akadiri, 2018. "Asymmetric Effects of Inequality on Per Capita Real GDP of the United States," Working Papers 201820, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Jannati, Sima & Korniotis, George & Kumar, Alok, 2020. "Big fish in a small pond: Locally dominant firms and the business cycle," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 219-240.
    4. Adnen Ben Nasr & Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta & Seyi Saint Akadiri, 2020. "Asymmetric effects of inequality on real output levels of the United States," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 10(1), pages 47-69, March.
    5. Caterina Astarita & Salvador Barrios & Francesca D'Auria & Anamaria Maftei & Philipp Mohl & Matteo Salto & Marie-Luise Schmitz & Alberto Tumino & Edouard Turkisch, 2018. "Impact of fiscal policy on income distribution," Report on Public Finances in EMU, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission, pages 71-131, January.
    6. Jannati, Sima, 2020. "Geographic spillover of dominant firms’ shocks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 118(C).
    7. Masakazu Kumakura & Daizo Kojima, 2018. "Japan’s Inequality and Redistribution: The Perspectives of Human Capital and Taxation/Social Insurance," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 14(4), pages 663-690, July.
    8. Duc Hong Vo & Thang Cong Nguyen & Ngoc Phu Tran & Anh The Vo, 2019. "What Factors Affect Income Inequality and Economic Growth in Middle-Income Countries?," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(1), pages 1-12, March.
    9. Paolo Di Caro, 2017. "The contribution of tax statistics for analysing regional income disparities in Italy," Journal of Income Distribution, Ad libros publications inc., vol. 25(1), pages 1-27, March.

  2. Chakraborty, Indraneel & Hai, Rong & Holter, Hans A. & Stepanchuk, Serhiy, 2017. "The real effects of financial (dis)integration: A multi-country equilibrium analysis of Europe," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 28-45.

    Cited by:

    1. Chakraborty, Indraneel & Goldstein, Itay & MacKinlay, Andrew, 2020. "Monetary stimulus and bank lending," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 189-218.
    2. Gabriele Camera & Lukas Hohl & Rolf Weder, 2019. "Breaking Up: Experimental Insights into Economic (Dis)Integration," Working Papers 19-25, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    3. Jyh-Horng Lin & Pei-Chi Lii & Fu-Wei Huang & Shi Chen, 2019. "Cross-Border Lending, Government Capital Injection, and Bank Performance," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(2), pages 1-20, April.
    4. Otilia-Roxana Oprea, 0. "Financial Integration or Disintegration during the Financial Crisis," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 20(65), pages 122-136, September.
    5. Liu, Hao, 2019. "The communication and European Regional economic growth: The interactive fixed effects approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 299-311.
    6. Sandro C. Andrade & Vidhi Chhaochharia, 2018. "The Costs of Sovereign Default: Evidence from the Stock Market," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 31(5), pages 1707-1751.

  3. Rong Hai & James Heckman, 2017. "Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 4-36, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.

Software components

    Sorry, no citations of software components recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (6) 2013-06-04 2013-09-13 2014-04-29 2015-02-11 2017-01-08 2017-01-22. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (4) 2013-06-04 2014-04-29 2015-02-11 2017-01-08. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2013-06-04 2014-01-17. Author is listed
  4. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (2) 2013-06-04 2014-01-17. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2014-01-17 2017-01-08. Author is listed
  6. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2013-09-28 2014-04-29. Author is listed
  7. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2013-09-28 2014-04-29. Author is listed
  8. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2017-01-08

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