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Estimating the Value of Higher Education Financial Aid: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Christian Belzil
  • Arnaud Maurel
  • Modibo Sidibé

Abstract

Using data from a Canadian field experiment on the financial barriers to higher education, we estimate the distribution of the value of financial aid for prospective students, and relate it to parental socio-economic background, individual skills, risk and time preferences. Our results point out that a considerable share of prospective students are affected by credit constraints. We find that most of the individuals are willing to pay a sizable interest premium above the prevailing market rate for the option to take up a loan, with a median interest rate wedge equal to 6.6 percentage points for a $1,000 loan. The willingness-to-pay for financial aid is highly heterogeneous across students, with preferences and in particular discount factors, playing a key role in accounting for this variation.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Belzil & Arnaud Maurel & Modibo Sidibé, 2017. "Estimating the Value of Higher Education Financial Aid: Evidence from a Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23641, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23641
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Belzil, Christian & Sidibé, Modibo, 2016. "Internal and External Validity of Experimental Risk and Time Preferences," IZA Discussion Papers 10348, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Jeffrey T. Denning & Benjamin M. Marx & Lesley J. Turner, 2017. "ProPelled: The Effects of Grants on Graduation, Earnings, and Welfare," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 17-280, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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