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Bet Helena Caeyers

Personal Details

First Name:Bet
Middle Name:Helena
Last Name:Caeyers
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca1167

Affiliation

ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP)
Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ifs.org.uk/centres/cpp/

+44 (0)20 7291 4800
+44 (0)20 7323 4780
7 Ridgmount Street, London WC1E 7AE
RePEc:edi:cfifsuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bet Caeyers & Marcel Fafchamps, 2016. "Exclusion Bias in the Estimation of Peer Effects," NBER Working Papers 22565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Bet Caeyers, 2014. "Exclusion bias in empirical social interaction models: causes, consequences and solutions," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Bet Caeyers, 2014. "Peer effects in development programme awareness of vulnerable groups in rural Tanzania," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Caeyers, Bet & Dercon, Stefan, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," CEPR Discussion Papers 8860, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. CAEYERS, Bet & PAUWELS, Wilfried, 2006. "Corporatism and macroeconomic stabilization policies," Working Papers 2006035, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    repec:ter:wpaper:0007 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Caeyers, Bet & Chalmers, Neil & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2012. "Improving consumption measurement and other survey data through CAPI: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 19-33.
  2. Bet Caeyers & Stefan Dercon, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 639-675.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bet Caeyers & Marcel Fafchamps, 2016. "Exclusion Bias in the Estimation of Peer Effects," NBER Working Papers 22565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Yann Bramoullé & Habiba Djebbari & Bernard Fortin, 2020. "Peer Effects in Networks: a Survey," AMSE Working Papers 1936, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    2. Scott E. Carrell & Mark Hoekstra & James E. West, 2019. "The Impact of College Diversity on Behavior toward Minorities," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 159-182, November.
    3. González, Felipe, 2020. "Collective action in networks: Evidence from the Chilean student movement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    4. Chevalier, Arnaud & Isphording, Ingo E. & Lisauskaite, Elena, 2019. "Peer Diversity, College Performance and Educational Choices," IZA Discussion Papers 12202, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Stephen L. Ross & Zhentao Shi, 2016. "Measuring Social Interaction Effects when Instruments are Weak," Working Papers 2016-033, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    6. Battiston, Diego, 2018. "The Persistent Effects of Brief Interactions: Evidence from Immigrant Ships," MPRA Paper 97151, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Cheti Nicoletti & Kjell G. Salvanes & Emma Tominey, 2020. "Mothers working during preschool years and child skills. Does income compensate?," CHILD Working Papers Series 76 JEL Classification: I2, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    8. Jochmans, K., 2020. "Testing Random Assignment to Peer Groups," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2024, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Massimo Anelli & Kevin Shih & Kevin Williams, 2017. "Foreign Peer Effects and STEM Major Choice," CESifo Working Paper Series 6466, CESifo.
    10. Chevalier, Arnaud & Isphording, Ingo E. & Lisauskaite, Elena, 2020. "Peer diversity, college performance and educational choices," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    11. Cai, Jing & Szeidl, Adam, 2016. "Interfirm Relationships and Business Performance," CEPR Discussion Papers 11717, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Brune, Lasse & Chyn, Eric T. & Kerwin, Jason Theodore, 2020. "Peers and Motivation at Work: Evidence from a Firm Experiment in Malawi," SocArXiv axbth, Center for Open Science.
    13. Luca Paolo Merlino & Max Friedrich Steinhardt & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2019. "More than just friends? School peers and adult interracial relationships," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-02087855, HAL.
    14. Francesco Amodio & Miguel A Martinez-Carrasco, 2018. "Input Allocation, Workforce Management and Productivity Spillovers: Evidence from Personnel Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 85(4), pages 1937-1970.
    15. Marcel Fafchamps & Simon Quinn, 2018. "Networks and Manufacturing Firms in Africa: Results from a Randomized Field Experiment," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 32(3), pages 656-675.
    16. Marcel Fafchamps & Di Mo, 2018. "Peer effects in computer assisted learning: evidence from a randomized experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 355-382, June.
    17. Leila Agha & Dan Zeltzer, 2019. "Drug Diffusion Through Peer Networks: The Influence of Industry Payments," NBER Working Papers 26338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Esteves, Rui & Geisler Mesevage, Gabriel, 2019. "Social Networks in Economic History: Opportunities and Challenges," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    19. Gueye, Ababacar S. & Audibert, Martine & Delaunay, Valérie, 2018. "Can social groups impact schooling decisions? Evidence from castes in rural Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 307-323.

  2. Bet Caeyers, 2014. "Exclusion bias in empirical social interaction models: causes, consequences and solutions," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Bet Caeyers, 2014. "Peer effects in development programme awareness of vulnerable groups in rural Tanzania," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

  3. Caeyers, Bet & Dercon, Stefan, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," CEPR Discussion Papers 8860, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Abay, Kibrom & Kahsay, Goytom & Berhane, Guush, 2015. "Social Networks and Factor Markets: Panel Data Evidence from Ethiopia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210869, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Carol Newman & Mengyang Zhang, 2015. "Connections and the Allocation of Public Benefits," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-031, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Khan, Qaiser & Faguet, Jean-Paul & Ambel, Alemayehu, 2017. "Blending Top-Down Federalism with Bottom-Up Engagement to Reduce Inequality in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 326-342.
    4. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "How is disaster aid allocated within poor villages?," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2011-004, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    5. Duru, Maya Joan, 2016. "Too Certain to Invest? Public Safety Nets and Insurance Markets in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 37-51.
    6. Knippenberg, Erwin & Hoddinott, John F., 2017. "Shocks, social protection, and resilience: Evidence from Ethiopia," ESSP working papers 109, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Marcel Fafchamps & Julien Labonne, 2014. "Do Politicians' Relatives Get Better Jobs? Evidence from Municipal Elections," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-37, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Guirkinger, Catherine & Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 2019. "The dynamics of family systems: lessons from past and present times," CEPR Discussion Papers 13570, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Abay, Kibrom A. & Kahsay, Goytom A. & Berhane, Guush, 2014. "Social networks and factor markets: Panel data evidence from Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 68, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Han, Huawei & Gao, Qin, 2019. "Community-based welfare targeting and political elite capture: Evidence from rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 145-159.
    11. Guojun He & Shaoda Wang, 2016. "Do College Graduates Serving as Village Officials Help Rural China?," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2016-39, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Nov 2016.
    12. Véronique Gille, 2016. "Application for social programs: the role of local politics and caste networks in affirmative action in India," Working Papers DT/2016/13, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    13. Christine Buttorff & Antonio J. Trujillo & Fernando Ruiz & Jeannette L. Amaya, 2015. "Low rural health insurance take-up in a universal coverage system: perceptions of health insurance among the uninsured in La Guajira, Colombia," International Journal of Health Planning and Management, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(2), pages 98-110, April.
    14. Muhammad Haseeb & Kate Vyborny, 2016. "Imposing institutions: Evidence from cash transfer reform in Pakistan," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-36, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    15. Simons, Andrew M., 2016. "What is the optimal locus of control for social assistance programs? Evidence from the productive safety net programme in Ethiopia," ESSP working papers 86, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Asfaw, Solomon & Maggio, Giuseppe & Palma, Alessandro, 2018. "Climate resilience pathways of rural households: evidence from Ethiopia," ESA Working Papers 288952, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Agricultural Development Economics Division (ESA).
    17. Fisher, Eleanor & Attah, Ramlatu & Barca, Valentina & O'Brien, Clare & Brook, Simon & Holland, Jeremy & Kardan, Andrew & Pavanello, Sara & Pozarny, Pamela, 2017. "The Livelihood Impacts of Cash Transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa: Beneficiary Perspectives from Six Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 299-319.
    18. Laura Camfield, 2014. "Growing Up in Ethiopia and Andhra Pradesh: The Impact of Social Protection Schemes on Girls’ Roles and Responsibilities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(1), pages 107-123, January.
    19. Stefan Dercon, 2011. "Social Protection, Efficiency and Growth," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    20. Elsa Valli, 2017. "Essays on social protection," Economics PhD Theses 1017, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    21. Manabu Nose, 2014. "Micro Responses to Disaster Relief Aid: Design Problems for Aid Efficacy," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(4), pages 727-767.
    22. Gelo Dambala & Muchapondwa Edwin & Shimeles Abebe, 2017. "Working Paper 288 - Return to Investment in Agricultural Cooperatives in Ethiopia," Working Paper Series 2406, African Development Bank.
    23. Gelo, Dambala & Muchapondwa, Edwin & Koch, Steven F., 2016. "Decentralization, market integration and efficiency-equity trade-offs: Evidence from Joint Forest Management in Ethiopian villages," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 1-23.
    24. Azam Chaudhry & Kate Vyborny, 2013. "Patronage in Rural Punjab: Evidence from a New Household Survey Dataset," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(Special E), pages 183-209, September.
    25. Gelo, Dambala & Muchapondwa, Edwin & Shimeles, Abebe & Dikgang, Johane, 2019. "Welfare Effect and Elite Capture in Agricultural Cooperatives Intervention: Evidence from Ethiopian Villages," IZA Discussion Papers 12495, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. CAEYERS, Bet & PAUWELS, Wilfried, 2006. "Corporatism and macroeconomic stabilization policies," Working Papers 2006035, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicola Acocella & Giovanni Bartolomeo, 2013. "The Cost Of Social Pacts," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(3), pages 238-255, July.

Articles

  1. Caeyers, Bet & Chalmers, Neil & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2012. "Improving consumption measurement and other survey data through CAPI: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 19-33.

    Cited by:

    1. Utz Pape & Luca Parisotto, 2019. "Estimating Poverty in a Fragile Context – The High Frequency Survey in South Sudan," HiCN Working Papers 305, Households in Conflict Network.
    2. Tandon, Sharad & Landes, Maurice & Christensen, Cheryl & LeGrand, Steven & Broussard, Nzinga & Farrin, Katie & Thome, Karen, 2017. "Progress and Challenges in Global Food Security," Economic Information Bulletin 262131, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Joachim De Weerdt & Garance Genicot & Alice Mesnard, 2014. "Asymmetry of information within family networks," Working Papers of LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance 503751, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance.
    4. Joachim De Weerdt & Kathleen Beegle & Jed Friedman & John Gibson, 2016. "The Challenge of Measuring Hunger through Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(4), pages 727-758.
    5. De Weerdt, Joachim & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2013. "Risk sharing and internal migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6429, The World Bank.
    6. Rao, Lakshman Nagraj & Gentile, Elisabetta & Pipon, Dave & Roque, Jude David & Thuy, Vu Thi Thu, 2020. "The impact of computer-assisted personal interviewing on survey duration, quality, and cost: Evidence from the Viet Nam Labor Force Survey," GLO Discussion Paper Series 605, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    7. Utz Pape & Philip Wollburg, 2019. "Estimation of Poverty in Somalia Using Innovative Methodologies," HiCN Working Papers 306, Households in Conflict Network.
    8. Li, Wenchao & Song, Changcheng & Xu, Shu & Yi, Junjian, 2017. "Household Portfolio Choice, Reference Dependence, and the Marriage Market," IZA Discussion Papers 10528, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. De Weerdt, Joachim & Beegle, Kathleen & Friedman,, Jed & Gibson, John, 2014. "The challenge of measuring hunger," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6736, The World Bank.
    10. Joachim De Weerdt & John Gibson & Kathleen Beegle, 2019. "What can we learn from experimenting with survey methods?," LICOS Discussion Papers 41819, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    11. Root, Christopher & Maredia, Mywish K., 2017. "Testing the Local Enumerator Approach for Farm Level Data Collection: The Case of Natural Resource Management Technology Adoption in India," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258098, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Johanna Choumert-Nkolo & Pascale Phelinas, 2018. "New paradigms for household surveys in low and middle income countries [Nouveaux paradigmes d'élaboration des enquêtes ménages dans les pays du Sud]," Working Papers halshs-01888609, HAL.
    13. Böhme, Marcus & Stöhr, Tobias, 2012. "Guidelines for the use of household interview duration analysis in CAPI survey management," Kiel Working Papers 1779, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

  2. Bet Caeyers & Stefan Dercon, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 639-675.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (2) 2012-03-28 2014-03-08
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2012-03-28 2014-03-08
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2012-03-28 2014-03-08
  4. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (2) 2014-02-02 2016-09-04
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2007-10-20 2007-11-10
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2014-03-08 2016-09-04
  7. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2012-03-28
  8. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2012-03-28

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