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The impact of computer-assisted personal interviewing on survey duration, quality, and cost: Evidence from the Viet Nam Labor Force Survey

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  • Rao, Lakshman Nagraj
  • Gentile, Elisabetta
  • Pipon, Dave
  • Roque, Jude David
  • Thuy, Vu Thi Thu

Abstract

We use a randomized field experiment to estimate the effect of computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI) on interview duration, number of errors, respondent perceptions, and cost. During Quarter 3 of the 2017 Labor Force Survey data collection for Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, 15 households were randomly selected and interviewed using pencil-and-paper interviewing (PAPI), while another 15 households were randomly selected and interviewed using CAPI within each of a total of 180 sample enumeration areas. On average, CAPI interviews lasted 9.4 minutes less and had 0.8 less errors per questionnaire relative to PAPI. Respondents were more likely to perceive interview duration as long or very long when the enumerator was female or educated to college level or above, which is contrary to our experimental findings. Finally, the break-even number of interviews that make CAPI cost-effective is 1,769, which is lower than prior estimates and reflects the rapidly decreasing cost of technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Rao, Lakshman Nagraj & Gentile, Elisabetta & Pipon, Dave & Roque, Jude David & Thuy, Vu Thi Thu, 2020. "The impact of computer-assisted personal interviewing on survey duration, quality, and cost: Evidence from the Viet Nam Labor Force Survey," GLO Discussion Paper Series 605, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:605
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Schräpler, Jörg-Peter & Schupp, Jürgen & Wagner, Gert G., 2010. "Changing from PAPI to CAPI: Introducing CAPI in a Longitudinal Study," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 239-269.
    6. Caeyers, Bet & Chalmers, Neil & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2012. "Improving consumption measurement and other survey data through CAPI: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 19-33.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    computer-assisted personal interviewing; data quality; randomized experiment; survey; labor statistics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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