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Heather M. Boushey

Personal Details

First Name:Heather
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Boushey
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbo207
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://heatherboushey.com

Affiliation

(95%) Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.equitablegrowth.org/

: 202-545-3341

1500 K Street, NW, Suite 850, Washington, DC 20005
RePEc:edi:wcegwus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Center for American Progress

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.americanprogress.org/

: 202-682-1611
202-682-1867
1333 H Street NW, 10th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005
RePEc:edi:caprous (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Heather Boushey & Shawn Fremstad & Rachel Gragg & Margy Waller, 2007. "Understanding Low-Wage Work in the United States," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2007-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  2. Heather Boushey & Christian E. Weller, 2006. "Inequality and Household Economic Hardship in the United States of America," Working Papers 18, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  3. Heather Boushey, 2006. "Tag Team-Parenting," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2006-20, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  4. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Family-Friendly Policies: Boosting Mothers' Wages," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-12, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  5. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Are Women Opting Out? Debunking the Myth," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-36, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  6. Heather Boushey & Dean Baker & David Rosnick, 2005. "Gender Bias in the Current Economic Recovery? Declining Employment Rates for Women in the 21st Century," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-24, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  7. Heather Boushey, 2005. "No Way Out: How Prime Age Workers Get Trapped in Minimum Wage Jobs," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-19, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  8. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Social Security: The Most Important Anti-Poverty Program for Children," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-11, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  9. Andrew Stettner & Heather Boushey & Jeff Wenger, 2005. "Clearing the Path to Unemployment Insurance for Low-Wage Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-23, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  10. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Student Debt: Bigger and Bigger," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-27, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  11. Heather Boushey, 2005. "The Effects on Employment and Wages When Medicaid and Child Care Subsidies are no Longer Available," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-04, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  12. Heather Boushey, 2005. "When Done Right, Work Supports Work: Medicaid and Mothers' Employment and Wages," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  13. Heather Boushey & Jeff Wenger, 2005. "Finding the Better Fit: Receiving Unemployment Insurance Increases Likelihood of Re-employment with Health Insurance," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-13, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  14. Heather Boushey & John Schmitt, 2005. "The Impact of Proposed Minimum-Wage Increase on Low-Income Families," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-37, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

Articles

  1. Heather Boushey, 2014. "Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(3), pages 84-96.
  2. John Schmitt & Heather Boushey, 2012. "Why Don't More Young People Go to College?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(4), pages 78-93.
  3. Heather Boushey, 2012. "Growing from the middle out: US jobs and the economy in Obama's second term," Public Policy Review, Institute for Public Policy Research, vol. 19(3), pages 181-187, August.
  4. Heather Boushey & Chris Tilly, 2009. "The Limits of Work-Based Social Support in the United States," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 81-114.
  5. Heather Boushey & Christian Weller, 2008. "Has Growing Inequality Contributed to Rising Household Economic Distress?," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22.
  6. Heather Boushey, 2008. "Family Friendly Policies: Helping Mothers Make Ends Meet," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(1), pages 51-70.
  7. Heather Boushey, 2008. "“Opting out?” The effect of children on women's employment in the United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-36.
  8. Heather Boushey, 2002. "Reworking the Wage Curve: Exploring the consistency of the model across time, space and demographic group," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 293-311.
  9. Heather Boushey & Steven Pressman, 1997. "The Economic Contributions of David M. Gordon," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 225-245.

Chapters

  1. Heather Boushey, 2013. "The role of the government in work–family conflict in the US," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 19, pages 307-322 Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Heather Boushey & Shawn Fremstad & Rachel Gragg & Margy Waller, 2007. "Understanding Low-Wage Work in the United States," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2007-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. John Schmitt & Hye Jin Rho, 2008. "The Reagan Question: Are You Better Off Now Than You Were Eight Years Ago?," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-27, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    2. John Schmitt, 2009. "Unions and Upward Mobility for Service-Sector Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2009-14, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    3. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Low-wage mothers on the edge in the US," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 16, pages 257-272 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Grimshaw, Damian., 2014. "At work but earning less : trends in decent pay and minimum wages for young people," ILO Working Papers 994862833402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. John Schmitt, 2008. "Unions and Upward Mobility for African-American Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-11, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    6. Grimshaw, Damian., 2011. "What do we know about low wage work and low wage workers? : Analysing the definitions, patterns, causes and consequences in international perspective," ILO Working Papers 994648583402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Gerhard Reinecke & Damian Grimshaw, 2015. "Labour market inequality between youth and adults: a special case?," Chapters,in: Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality, chapter 14, pages 361-398 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. David R. Howell, Mamadou Diallo, 2007. "WP 2007-6 Charting U.S. Economic Performance with Alternative Labor Market Indicators: The Importance of Accounting for Job Quality," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2007-6, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    9. Dean Baker, 2008. "The Key to Stabilizing House Prices: Bring Them Down," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-32, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    10. Janine Berg (ed.), 2015. "Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16143, April.

  2. Heather Boushey & Christian E. Weller, 2006. "Inequality and Household Economic Hardship in the United States of America," Working Papers 18, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Giovannoni, 2014. "What Do We Know About the Labor Share and the Profit Share? Part III: Measures and Structural Factors," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_805, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Till van Treeck, 2012. "Did inequality cause the U.S. financial crisis?," IMK Working Paper 91-2012, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    3. Theobald, Thomas & Belabed, Christian A., 2014. "Income Distribution and Current Account Imbalances," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100371, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Grinstein-Weiss, Michal & Spader, Jonathan & Yeo, Yeong Hun & Taylor, Andréa & Books Freeze, Elizabeth, 2011. "Parental transfer of financial knowledge and later credit outcomes among low- and moderate-income homeowners," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 78-85, January.
    5. van Treeck, Till & Behringer, Jan, 2014. "Income Distribution and Current Account: A Sectoral Perspective," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100296, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2015. "Conspicuous Consumption, Inequality and Debt: The Nature of Consumption-driven Profit-led Regimes," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(1), pages 51-70, February.
    7. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2013. "Exploring Pluralist Economics: The Case of the Minsky-Veblen Cycles," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 515-524.
    8. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2012. "Debt, Boom, Bust: A Theory of Minsky-Veblen Cycles," Economics working papers 2012-14, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    9. Photis Lysandrou, 2011. "Global Inequality and the Global Financial Crisis: The New Transmission Mechanism," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 27 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. van Treeck, Till. & Sturn, Simon., 2012. "Income inequality as a cause of the Great Recession? : A survey of current debates," ILO Working Papers 994709343402676, International Labour Organization.

  3. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Family-Friendly Policies: Boosting Mothers' Wages," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-12, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Lonnie Golden, 2008. "Limited Access: Disparities in Flexible Work Schedules and Work-at-home," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 86-109, March.

  4. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Are Women Opting Out? Debunking the Myth," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-36, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2010. "Assessing the impact of education and marriage on labor market exit decisions of women," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2010-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. Seonyoung Park, 2014. "Recent Stagnation of Married Women’s Labor Supply: A Life-Cycle Structural Model," Working Papers 14-10, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    3. Hélène Périvier-Timbeau, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux Etats-Unis," Working Papers hal-00973039, HAL.
    4. Macunovich, Diane J., 2009. "Reversals in the Patterns of Women's Labor Supply in the U.S., 1976-2009," IZA Discussion Papers 4512, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Joni Hersch, 2013. "Opting out among women with elite education," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 469-506, December.
    6. Heather Antecol, 2015. "Career and Family Choices Among Elite Liberal Arts Graduates," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1089-1120, August.
    7. Mary C. Still, 2006. "The opt-out revolution in the United States: implications for modern organizations," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2-3), pages 159-171.
    8. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 1-21, May.
    9. Antecol, Heather, 2010. "The Opt-Out Revolution: A Descriptive Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5089, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Hélène Périvier, 2009. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis : évolutions mises en perspective avec celles de la France et de la Suède," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompq, Sciences Po.
    11. Seonglim Lee & Jinkook Lee & Yunhee Chang, 2014. "Is Dual Income Costly for Married Couples? An Analysis of Household Expenditures," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 161-177, June.
    12. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    13. Saul D. Hoffman, 2008. "The Changing Impact of Marriage and Children on Women’s Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 08-19, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    14. Qingyan Shang & Bruce Weinberg, 2013. "Opting for families: recent trends in the fertility of highly educated women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 5-32, January.
    15. Jane Leber Herr & Catherine Wolfram, 2009. "Work Environment and "Opt-Out" Rates at Motherhood Across High-Education Career Paths," NBER Working Papers 14717, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  5. Heather Boushey & Dean Baker & David Rosnick, 2005. "Gender Bias in the Current Economic Recovery? Declining Employment Rates for Women in the 21st Century," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-24, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Are Women Opting Out? Debunking the Myth," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-36, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    2. Hélène Périvier-Timbeau, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux Etats-Unis," Working Papers hal-00973039, HAL.
    3. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 221-242.
    4. Hélène Périvier, 2009. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis : évolutions mises en perspective avec celles de la France et de la Suède," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompq, Sciences Po.

  6. Heather Boushey, 2005. "No Way Out: How Prime Age Workers Get Trapped in Minimum Wage Jobs," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-19, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Anita Richert-Kazmierska, 2015. "Demographic Changes In Poland – The Regional Dimension," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 10(1), pages 113-128, March.

  7. Andrew Stettner & Heather Boushey & Jeff Wenger, 2005. "Clearing the Path to Unemployment Insurance for Low-Wage Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-23, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Annalisa Mastri & Wayne Vroman & Karen Needels & Walter Nicholson, "undated". "States' Decisions to Adopt Unemployment Compensation Provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bd21b1355ca44ebf87773e89a, Mathematica Policy Research.

  8. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Student Debt: Bigger and Bigger," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-27, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Wiederspan, Mark, 2016. "Denying loan access: The student-level consequences when community colleges opt out of the Stafford loan program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 79-96.

  9. Heather Boushey, 2005. "The Effects on Employment and Wages When Medicaid and Child Care Subsidies are no Longer Available," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-04, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Ahn, Haksoon, 2012. "Child care subsidy, child care costs, and employment of low-income single mothers," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 379-387.
    2. Heather Boushey, 2005. "When Done Right, Work Supports Work: Medicaid and Mothers' Employment and Wages," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

  10. Heather Boushey & Jeff Wenger, 2005. "Finding the Better Fit: Receiving Unemployment Insurance Increases Likelihood of Re-employment with Health Insurance," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-13, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    Cited by:

    1. Yamada, Gustavo & Cárdenas, María, 2009. "Reinserción laboral adecuada: dificultades e implicancias de política," MPRA Paper 22108, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Heather Boushey, 2014. "Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(3), pages 84-96.

    Cited by:

    1. Pirmin Fessler & Martin Schürz, 2017. "Zur Verteilung der Sparquoten in Österreich," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 3, pages 13-33.

  2. Heather Boushey & Chris Tilly, 2009. "The Limits of Work-Based Social Support in the United States," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 81-114.

    Cited by:

    1. Massimo FLORIO, 2012. "The real roots of the great recession: unsustainable income distribution," Departmental Working Papers 2012-01, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.

  3. Heather Boushey & Christian Weller, 2008. "Has Growing Inequality Contributed to Rising Household Economic Distress?," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22.

    Cited by:

    1. Bill Lucarelli, 2011. "The Economics of Financial Turbulence," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14252, April.
    2. Barry Z. Cynamon & Steven M. Fazzari, 2016. "Inequality, the Great Recession and slow recovery," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 373-399.
    3. Adkisson, Richard V. & Saucedo, Eduardo, 2012. "Emulation and state-by-state variations in bankruptcy rates," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 400-407.
    4. Steven Pressman, 2009. "Public Policies and the Middle Class throughout the World in the Mid 2000s," LIS Working papers 517, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    5. Boris Cournède & Oliver Denk & Peter Hoeller, 2015. "Finance and Inclusive Growth," OECD Economic Policy Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
    6. Hafizah Hammad Ahmad Khan & Hussin Abdullah & Shamzaeffa Samsudin, 2016. "The Linkages between Household Consumption and Household Debt Composition in Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1354-1359.

  4. Heather Boushey, 2008. "Family Friendly Policies: Helping Mothers Make Ends Meet," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(1), pages 51-70.

    Cited by:

    1. Heather Boushey, 2005. "Are Women Opting Out? Debunking the Myth," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-36, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    2. Christian Nsiah & Ron DeBeaumont & Annette Ryerson, 2013. "Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 224-234, June.

  5. Heather Boushey, 2008. "“Opting out?” The effect of children on women's employment in the United States," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-36.

    Cited by:

    1. Øystein Kravdal, 2014. "The Estimation of Fertility Effects on Happiness: Even More Difficult than Usually Acknowledged," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(3), pages 263-290, August.
    2. Gunseli Berik & Ebru Kongar, 2012. "Time Use of Mothers and Fathers in Hard Times: The US Recession of 2007-09," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_726, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina & Almudena Sevilla-Sanz, 2012. "Social norms, partnerships and children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 215-236, June.
    4. Fox, Liana & Han, Wen-Jui & Ruhm, Christopher J. & Waldfogel, Jane, 2011. "Time for Children: Trends in the Employment Patterns of Parents, 1967-2009," IZA Discussion Papers 5761, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Kravdal, Øystein, 2013. "Reflections on the Search for Fertility Effects on Happiness," Memorandum 10/2013, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    6. Kravdal, Øystein, 2016. "Expected and unexpected consequences of childbearing – a methodologically and politically important distinction that is overlooked," Memorandum 05/2016, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    7. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 221-242.
    8. de Jong, Eelke & Smits, Jeroen & Longwe, Abiba, 2017. "Estimating the Causal Effect of Fertility on Women’s Employment in Africa Using Twins," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 360-368.
    9. Joni Hersch, 2013. "Opting out among women with elite education," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 469-506, December.
    10. Rense Nieuwenhuis & Henk Van der Kolk & Ariana Need, 2016. "Women’s Earnings and Household Inequality in OECD Countries, 1973–2013," LIS Working papers 598, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    11. Heather Antecol, 2015. "Career and Family Choices Among Elite Liberal Arts Graduates," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1089-1120, August.
    12. Sarah Damaske & Adrianne Frech, 2016. "Women’s Work Pathways Across the Life Course," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(2), pages 365-391, April.
    13. Rense Nieuwenhuis & Wim Van Lancker & Diego Collado & Bea Cantillon, 2016. "Has the potential for compensating poverty by women’s employment growth been depleted?," ImPRovE Working Papers 16/02, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    14. van der Stoep, Gabrielle, 2008. "Childbearing and labour force participation in South Africa: sibling composition as an identification strategy?," MPRA Paper 52908, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Hélène Périvier, 2009. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis : évolutions mises en perspective avec celles de la France et de la Suède," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompq, Sciences Po.
    16. Irene Böckmann & Joya Misra & Michelle Budig, 2013. "Mothers' employment in wealthy countries: how do cultural and institutional factors shape the motherhood employment and working hours gap?," LIS Working papers 594, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    17. Christopher Tamborini & Howard Iams, 2011. "Are Generation X’ers Different than Late Boomers? Family and Earnings Trends among Recent Cohorts of Women at Young Adulthood," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(1), pages 59-79, February.
    18. Seonglim Lee & Jinkook Lee & Yunhee Chang, 2014. "Is Dual Income Costly for Married Couples? An Analysis of Household Expenditures," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 161-177, June.
    19. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen, 2011. "Housewives in a dual-earner society. Who is a housewife in contemporary Norway?," Discussion Papers 659, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    20. Dorrit, Posel & Gabrielle, van der Stoep, 2008. "Co-resident and absent mothers: Motherhood and labour force participation in South Africa," MPRA Paper 52907, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Alexandra Killewald & Xiaolin Zhou, 2015. "Mothers' Long-Term Employment Patterns," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 15-247, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

  6. Heather Boushey, 2002. "Reworking the Wage Curve: Exploring the consistency of the model across time, space and demographic group," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 293-311.

    Cited by:

    1. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2004. "Spatial Heterogeneity and the Wage Curve revisited," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-054/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Baltagi, Badi H. & Rokicki, Bartlomiej & Barreiro de Souza, Kênia, 2014. "The Brazilian Wage Curve: New Evidence from the National Household Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 8468, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Badi Baltagi & Bartlomiej Rokicki, 2014. "The Spatial Polish Wage Curve with Gender Effects: Evidence from the Polish Labor Survey," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 171, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    4. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2007. "CGE Modeling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Economics Working Paper Series 0706, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2005. "The Wage Curve Reloaded," IZA Discussion Papers 1665, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Haci Mevlut Karatas, 2017. "The Turkish Spatial Wage Curve," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-21, August.

  7. Heather Boushey & Steven Pressman, 1997. "The Economic Contributions of David M. Gordon," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 225-245.

    Cited by:

    1. Deborah Figart, 2001. "Wage-setting under Fordism: The rise of job evaluation and the ideology of equal pay," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 405-425.
    2. Romar Correa, 2010. "Regime-Changes in a Stock-Flow-Consistent Model," Interdisciplinary Description of Complex Systems - scientific journal, Croatian Interdisciplinary Society Provider Homepage: http://indecs.eu, vol. 8(1), pages 24-33.

Chapters

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More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2006-08-26 2007-04-14
  2. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2007-04-09

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