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Reworking the Wage Curve: Exploring the consistency of the model across time, space and demographic group

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  • Heather Boushey

Abstract

This paper extends Blanchflower & Oswald's (1994) work on the wage curve to the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The wage curve is more elastic in US metropolitan areas than prior research shows for the nation as a whole, and the wage curve varies over the business cycle, becoming more elastic in periods of higher unemployment. The most striking finding is that black workers have a more elastic wage curve than do white workers. Estimating the wage curve with the non-employment rate, a measure of underemployment, shows elasticities that are substantially higher than for wage curves estimated with the unemployment rate. This trend further increases the negative effects on pay for blacks, who are more likely than white workers to be underemployed.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Boushey, 2002. "Reworking the Wage Curve: Exploring the consistency of the model across time, space and demographic group," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 293-311.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:14:y:2002:i:3:p:293-311
    DOI: 10.1080/09538250220147859
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 1995. "The Wage Curve," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026202375x, January.
    2. Harry J. Holzer & Michael A. Stoll, 2003. "Employer Demand for Welfare Recipients by Race," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 210-241, January.
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    6. Charles T. Carlstrom & Christy D. Rollow, 1998. "Regional variations in white-black earnings," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q II, pages 10-22.
    7. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1996. "Wage curve, unemployment duration and compensating differentials," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 425-434, December.
    8. Riddell, W Craig, 1981. "Contemporaneous Correlation in Wage Contract Studies," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(2), pages 515-516, March.
    9. Kloek, T, 1981. "OLS Estimation in a Model Where a Microvariable Is Explained by Aggregates and Contemporaneous Disturbances Are Equicorrelated," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(1), pages 205-207, January.
    10. Richard B. Freeman, 1990. "Employment and Earnings of Disadvantaged Young Men in a Labor Shortage Economy," NBER Working Papers 3444, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    12. James Tobin, 1993. "Poverty in Relation to Macroeconomic Trends, Cycles, and Policies," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1030R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts, 2007. "Evidence of demand factors in the determination of the labor market intermittency penalty," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2007-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    2. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 2005. "The Wage Curve Reloaded," NBER Working Papers 11338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:gam:jecnmx:v:5:y:2017:i:3:p:37-:d:110226 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2006. "Spatial Heterogeneity And The Wage Curve Revisited," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 707-731.
    5. Baltagi, Badi H. & Rokicki, Bartlomiej, 2014. "The spatial Polish wage curve with gender effects: Evidence from the Polish Labor Survey," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 36-47.
    6. Badi H. Baltagi & Bartlomiej Rokicki & Kênia Barreiro Souza, 2017. "The Brazilian wage curve: new evidence from the National Household Survey," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 267-286, August.
    7. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.

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