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Inequality and Household Economic Hardship in the United States of America

  • Heather Boushey
  • Christian E. Weller

Income inequality in the United States of America has increased over the past few decades. Along with this development, employee compensation as a share of national income has tended to decline, the profit share of national income has grown, and inequality within labour has risen. There is no empirical support for the argument that greater inequality has resulted in faster productivity growth, but there is some indication that rising inequality has been connected to slower demand growth. Increased access to credit may have temporarily muted the implications of greater income inequality.

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Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 18.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:18
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