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Credit supply to personal bankruptcy filers: evidence from credit card mailings

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Abstract

Are consumers who have filed for personal bankruptcy before excluded from the unsecured credit market? Using a unique data set of credit card mailings, we directly explore the supply of unsecured credit to consumers with the most conspicuous default risk--those with a bankruptcy history. On average, over one-fifth of personal bankruptcy filers receive at least one offer in a given month, with the likelihood being even higher for those who filed for bankruptcy within the previous two years. However, offers to bankruptcy filers carry substantially less favorable terms than those to comparable consumers without a bankruptcy history, with higher interest rates, lower credit limits, a greater likelihood of having an annual fee, and a smaller likelihood of having rewards or promotions. In addition, our analysis of credit terms typically disclosed only in the fine print suggests that offers to filers tend to include more \"hidden\" costs.

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  • Song Han & Benjamin J. Keys & Geng Li, 2011. "Credit supply to personal bankruptcy filers: evidence from credit card mailings," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2011-29, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2011-29
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    Cited by:

    1. Julapa Jagtiani & Wenli Li, 2014. "Credit access after consumer bankruptcy filing: new evidence," Working Papers 14-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Rajeev Darolia & Dubravka Ritter, 2017. "Strategic Default Among Private Student Loan Debtors: Evidence from Bankruptcy Reform," Working Papers 17-38, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    3. Susan Lund & Charles Roxburgh, 2010. "Debt and Deleveraging," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 11(2), pages 1-30, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bankruptcy; Credit cards; Consumer credit; Finance; Personal;
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