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Credit card redlining revisited

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  • Kenneth P. Brevoort

Abstract

Using a proprietary dataset of credit bureau records, Cohen-Cole (2008) finds that banks set credit limits on revolving accounts based in part on the racial composition of the neighborhood in which each borrower resides. This paper evaluates the evidence presented in that working paper using the same proprietary database of credit bureau records. The replication effort presented in this paper suggests that decisions about how to calculate the variables used in that study may have resulted in the unnecessary exclusion of one-fifth of available observations from the estimation samples and may have increased the size of the reported effect by over 25 percent. Furthermore, this analysis suggests that when a control for neighborhood income is added to the estimations, the results presented as evidence of redlining activities disappear.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth P. Brevoort, 2009. "Credit card redlining revisited," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2009-39, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2009-39
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gathergood John, 2011. "Racial Disparities in Credit Constraints in the Great Recession: Evidence from the UK," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-32, September.
    2. Song Han & Benjamin J. Keys & Geng Li, 2011. "Credit supply to personal bankruptcy filers: evidence from credit card mailings," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2011-29, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Sumit Agarwal & Gene Amromin & Itzhak Ben-David & Douglas D. Evanoff, 2016. "Loan Product Steering in Mortgage Markets," NBER Working Papers 22696, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Wardrip, Keith & Hunt, Robert M., 2013. "Residential Migration, Entry, and Exit as Seen Through the Lens of Credit Bureau Data," Payment Cards Center Discussion Paper 13-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl & Peter Grajzl & A. Joseph Guse & Richard M. Todd & Michael Williams, 2015. "Neighborhood Racial Characteristics, Credit History, and Bankcard Credit in Indian Country," CESifo Working Paper Series 5594, CESifo Group Munich.

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    Keywords

    Discrimination in consumer credit ; Discrimination in credit cards;

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