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Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality

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  • Janine Berg

Abstract

Labour market institutions, including collective bargaining, the regulation of employment contracts and social protection policies, are instrumental for improving the well-being of workers, their families and society. In many countries, these institutions have been eroded, whilst in other countries they do not exist at all.

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  • Janine Berg (ed.), 2015. "Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16143.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:16143
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781784712099.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen Pagés & Claudio E. Montenegro, 2007. "Job security and the age-composition of employment: evidence from Chile," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 34(2 Year 20), pages 109-139, December.
    2. Andrea Bassanini & Wooseok Ok, 2004. "How do firms' and individuals' incentives to invest in human capital vary across groups?," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00194344, HAL.
    3. Hyslop, Dean & Stillman, Steven, 2007. "Youth minimum wage reform and the labour market in New Zealand," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 201-230, April.
    4. Croucher, Richard & White, Geoff & Hawkes, Denise, 2011. "The impact of minimum wages on the youth labour market: an international literature review for the Low Pay Commission," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 5553, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    5. Yuji Genda & Ayako Kondo & Souichi Ohta, 2010. "Long-Term Effects of a Recession at Labor Market Entry in Japan and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
    6. Maite Blázquez Cuesta & Raquel Llorente Heras & Julián Moral Carcedo, 2011. "Minimum Wage And Youth Employment Rates, 2000-2008," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 19(2), pages 35-57, Autumn.
    7. Heather Boushey & Shawn Fremstad & Rachel Gragg & Margy Waller, 2007. "Understanding Low-Wage Work in the United States," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2007-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    8. Whitley, Richard, 2007. "Business Systems and Organizational Capabilities: The Institutional Structuring of Competitive Competences," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199205189.
    9. Maurizio, Roxana, 2011. "Trayectorias laborales de los jóvenes en Argentina: ¿dificultades en el mercado de trabajo o carrera laboral ascendente?," Macroeconomía del Desarrollo 109, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    10. Yang Du & Weiguang Pan, 2009. "Minimum Wage Regulation in China and Its Applications to Migrant Workers in the Urban Labor Market," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 17(2), pages 79-93, March.
    11. Antón, José-Ignacio & Muñoz de Bustillo, Rafael, 2011. "The impact of the minimum wage on Spanish youth: Evidence from a natural experiment," MPRA Paper 33488, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Paul Ryan, 2001. "The School-to-Work Transition: A Cross-National Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(1), pages 34-92, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deguilhem, Thibaud & Frontenaud, Adrien, 2016. "Régimes de qualité de l’emploi et diversité des pays émergents," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 19.

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