IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/16143_7.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

The ‘deconstruction’ of part-time work

In: Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality

Author

Listed:
  • Jon C. Messenger
  • Nikhil Ray

Abstract

Labour market institutions, including collective bargaining, the regulation of employment contracts and social protection policies, are instrumental for improving the well-being of workers, their families and society. In many countries, these institutions have been eroded, whilst in other countries they do not exist at all.

Suggested Citation

  • Jon C. Messenger & Nikhil Ray, 2015. "The ‘deconstruction’ of part-time work," Chapters,in: Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality, chapter 7, pages 184-208 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:16143_7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781784712099.00015.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrea Garnero & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2013. "Part-time Work, Wages and Productivity:Evidence from Belgian Matched Panel Data," DULBEA Working Papers 13-08, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2008. "Moving Down: Women's Part-Time Work and Occupational Change in Britain 1991-2001," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 52-76, February.
    3. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    4. Randi KJELDSTAD & Erik H. NYMOEN, 2012. "Part-time work and gender: Worker versus job explanations," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 151(1-2), pages 85-107, June.
    5. Lans Bovenberg & Ton Wilthagen & Sonja Bekker, 2008. "Flexicurity: Lessons and Proposals from the Netherlands," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 6(4), pages 9-14, December.
    6. Robert E. Hall & Alan B. Krueger, 2012. "Evidence on the Incidence of Wage Posting, Wage Bargaining, and On-the-Job Search," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 56-67, October.
    7. Eleonora Matteazzi & Ariane Pailhé & Anne Solaz, 2013. "Does Part-Time Employment Widen the Gender Wage Gap? Evidence from Twelve European Countries," Working Papers 293, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Barry T. Hirsch, 2005. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(4), pages 525-551, July.
    9. Abigail Gregory & Susan Milner, 2009. "Trade Unions and Work‐life Balance: Changing Times in France and the UK?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 122-146, March.
    10. Síle O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2007. "The part-time wage penalty in European countries: how large is it for men?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(7), pages 571-603, October.
    11. Maria Jepsen & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2005. "The wage penalty induced by part-time work: the case of Belgium," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 48(1-2), pages 73-94.
    12. Dorrit Posel & Colette Muller, 2008. "Is There Evidence Of A Wage Penalty To Female Part‐Time Employment In South Africa?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(3), pages 466-479, September.
    13. Andrea Garnero & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2014. "Part-Time Work, Wages, and Productivity," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 67(3), pages 926-954, July.
    14. repec:ces:ifodic:v:6:y:2008:i:4:p:14567207 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Síle O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2007. "The part-time wage penalty in European countries: how large is it for men?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(7), pages 571-603, November.
    16. Nicola-Maria Riley, 1997. "Determinants of Union Membership: A Review," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(2), pages 265-301, June.
    17. Joan R. Rodgers, 2004. "Hourly Wages of full-time and part-time employees in Australia," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 7(2), pages 231-254, June.
    18. Yoram Barzel, 1973. "The Determination of Daily Hours and Wages," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(2), pages 220-238.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "The part-time poverty gap across Europe: How institutions affect the way part-time and full-time workers avoid poverty differently," Working Papers 1603, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    2. Jeroen Horemans, 2017. "Atypical Employment and In-Work Poverty: A Different Story for Part-Timers and Temporary Workers?," Working Papers 1701, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:16143_7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.