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Moving Down: Women's Part-Time Work and Occupational Change in Britain 1991-2001

  • Sara Connolly
  • Mary Gregory

We give a quantitative analysis of the nature of occupational change - based on the utilisation of skills - as women make the transition between full-time and part-time work. We show that one-quarter of women moving from full- to part-time work experience downgrading. Women remaining with their current employer are less vulnerable and the availability of part-time opportunities is far more important than the presence of a pre-school child in determining whether a woman moves to a lower-skilled occupation. These findings indicate a loss of economic efficiency through the underutilisation of the skills of many of the women who work part-time. Copyright 2008 The Author(s). Journal compilation Royal Economic Society 2008.

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Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 118 (2008)
Issue (Month): 526 (02)
Pages: F52-F76

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:118:y:2008:i:526:p:f52-f76
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  1. Joseph Altonji & Christina Paxson, 1990. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints and Job Mobility," Working Papers 651, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. Gavan Conlon, 2001. "The differential in earnings premia between academically and vocationally trained males in the United Kingdom," CEE Discussion Papers 0011, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  3. Diane M. Houston & Gillian Marks, 2003. "The Role of Planning and Workplace Support in Returning to Work after Maternity Leave," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(2), pages 197-214, 06.
  4. Richard Blundell & Mike Brewer & Marco Francesconi, 2005. "Job changes, hours changes and the path of labour supply adjustment," IFS Working Papers W05/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Hakim, Catherine, 1998. "Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Students' Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293811, March.
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