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High Schools and Labour Market Outcomes: Italian Graduates

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  • Dario Pozzoli

    () (University of Bergamo)

Abstract

To provide empirical evidence on differences across high school tracks in early occupational labour market outcome, I estimate how the employment probability, the time before the first job is taken up, and earnings depend on high school type, controlling for student characteristics by a propensity score matching “average treatment on the treated” estimation method. I find that technical education enhances employment probability and shortens the time to get the first job, and also to a less extent increases early earnings. These results indicate that, for those youths going on the labour market immediately after high school, technical education is better than other educational tracks in terms of early labour market outcomes three years after graduation.

Suggested Citation

  • Dario Pozzoli, 2007. "High Schools and Labour Market Outcomes: Italian Graduates," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 66(2), pages 247-294, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:gde:journl:gde_v66_n2_p247-294
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    matching estimator; multiple treatment; returns to education; selection bias;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General

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