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Evidence on the returns to secondary vocational education

  • Meer, Jonathan

Vocational education in high schools has frequently been stigmatized as an anachronistic, dead-end path for students. We use data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988 to examine claims that students on a vocational track would benefit from a more academically rigorous education. Clearly, selection bias confounds attempts to untangle the effects of academic tracking on income after high school. Using an econometric framework that accounts for this bias, we find evidence of comparative advantage in tracking.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB9-4KV8TK9-1/2/66f9f3056a95ac51dfb8afdc2a5adc59
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 26 (2007)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 559-573

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:26:y:2007:i:5:p:559-573
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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  1. Mane, F., 1998. "Trends in the Payoff to Academic and Occupation-Specific Skills: The Short and Midium Run Returns to Academic and Vocational High School Courses for Non-College Bound Students," Papers 98-07, Cornell - Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies.
  2. Kerwin Kofi Charles & Erik Hurst, 2003. "The Correlation of Wealth across Generations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(6), pages 1155-1182, December.
  3. Kang, Suk & Bishop, John, 1989. "Vocational and academic education in high school: Complements or substitutes?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 133-148, April.
  4. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1980. "Labor Markets and Evaluations of Vocational Training Programs in the Public High Schools - Toward a Framework for Analysis," NBER Working Papers 0478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Lawrence Hotchkiss, 1993. "Effects of Training, Occupation, and Training-Occupation Match on Wage," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 482-496.
  8. Shoshana Neuman & Adrian Ziderman, 1999. "Vocational Education in Israel: Wage Effects of the VocEd-Occupation Match," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(2), pages 407-420.
  9. John Eric Fredland & Roger D. Little, 1980. "Long-Term Returns to Vocational Training: Evidence from Military Sources," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(1), pages 49-66.
  10. Card, David, 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1127-60, September.
  11. Dirk Krueger & Krishna B. Kumar, 2003. "Skill-specific rather then General Education: A Reason for US-Europe Growth Differences?," NBER Working Papers 9408, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Robert J. Willis & Sherwin Rosen, 1978. "Education and Self-Selection," NBER Working Papers 0249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  14. Bishop, John H. & Mane, Ferran, 2004. "The impacts of career-technical education on high school labor market success," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 381-402, August.
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  16. Dubin, Jeffrey A & McFadden, Daniel L, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Electric Appliance Holdings and Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 345-62, March.
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