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Working hours flexibility and older workers' labor supply

  • Anne C. Gielen

This paper studies the presence of hours constraints on the UK labor market and its effect on older workers labor supply. Using panel data for the period 1991-2004, the results from a competing risks model show that over-employed male workers can freely reduce working hours with their current employer before retiring completely. However, some over-employed women are observed to leave the labor market early due to hours constraints. This suggests that more flexibility in working hours can increase the labor market participation for some older workers as has often been suggested. Copyright 2009 , Oxford University Press.

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Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 61 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 240-274

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:61:y:2009:i:2:p:240-274
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