IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hdl/wpaper/1603.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The part-time poverty gap across Europe: How institutions affect the way part-time and full-time workers avoid poverty differently

Author

Listed:
  • Jeroen Horemans

Abstract

Drawing on EU-SILC 2012 data, this paper investigates the variation in the degree to which part-time and full-time workers avoid poverty differently by various income components in Europe. We look at three consecutive steps in the income package: individual earnings, market incomes of other household members, and government transfers. The results indicate that on average across Europe full-timers are more likely than part-timers to escape poverty with each step. On the other hand, much variation across countries is discovered. More stringent wage institutions, short working hour cultures and a strong support for working mothers are related with lower differences in earnings poverty between part-time and full-time workers. These institutional characteristics also reduce the difference in the degree to which part-time and full-time workers avoid poverty by other market incomes in the household. The difference in poverty reduction by government transfers between part-timers and full-timers was found to vary little across countries, but the degree to which part-time earnings are combined with benefits tends to be related to a larger difference pre-distribution poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "The part-time poverty gap across Europe: How institutions affect the way part-time and full-time workers avoid poverty differently," Working Papers 1603, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  • Handle: RePEc:hdl:wpaper:1603
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.centrumvoorsociaalbeleid.be/sites/default/files/CSB%20Working%20Paper%201603_July2017.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Manning, Alan & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2005. "The part-time pay penalty," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4614, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Henning Lohmann, 2008. "Welfare States, Labour Market Institutions and the Working Poor: A Comparative Analysis of 20 European Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 776, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Arnaud Dupuy & Daniel Fernandez-Kranz, 2011. "International differences in the family gap in pay: the role of labour market institutions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 413-438.
    4. Wim Van Lancker & Joris Ghysels, 2010. "Female employment, institutions and the role of reference groups: a multilevel analysis of 22 European countries," Working Papers 1002, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    5. Erik Snel & Jan de Boom & Godfried Engbersen, 2008. "The Silent Transformation of the Dutch Welfare State and the Rise of In-Work Poverty," Chapters, in: Hans-Jürgen Andreß & Henning Lohmann (ed.), The Working Poor in Europe, chapter 5, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Henning Lohmann, 2008. "The Working Poor in European Welfare States: Empirical Evidence from a Multilevel Perspective," Chapters, in: Hans-Jürgen Andreß & Henning Lohmann (ed.), The Working Poor in Europe, chapter 2, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Hielke Buddelmeyer & Gilles Mourre & Melanie Ward, 2008. "Why Europeans work part-time? A cross-country panel analysis," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.), Work, Earnings and Other Aspects of the Employment Relation, volume 28, pages 81-139, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    8. Giesselmann, Marco, 2015. "Differences in the Patterns of In-Work Poverty in Germany and the UK," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 27-46.
    9. François Rycx & Robert Plasman, 2001. "Collective bargaining and poverty: a cross-national perspective," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/795, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    10. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2008. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 28-51, February.
    11. Jon C. Messenger & Nikhil Ray, 2015. "The ‘deconstruction’ of part-time work," Chapters, in: Janine Berg (ed.), Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality, chapter 7, pages 184-208, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Eleonora Matteazzi & Ariane Pailhé & Anne Solaz, 2012. "Part-time wage penalties in Europe: A matter of selection or segregation?," Working Papers 250, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    13. Síle O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2007. "The part-time wage penalty in European countries: how large is it for men?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(7), pages 571-603, October.
    14. Kenworthy, Lane, 2008. "Jobs with Equality," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199550609.
    15. Janine Leschke, 2007. "Are unemployment insurance systems in Europe adapting to new risks arising from non-standard employment?," DULBEA Working Papers 07-05.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    16. Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "Polarisation of Non-standard Employment in Europe: Exploring a Missing Piece of the Inequality Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 171-189, January.
    17. Angela Cipollone & Eleonora Patacchini & Giovanna Vallanti, 2014. "Female labour market participation in Europe: novel evidence on trends and shaping factors," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-40, December.
    18. Jeroen Horemans, 2016. "Polarisation of Non-standard Employment in Europe: Exploring a Missing Piece of the Inequality Puzzle," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 171-189, January.
    19. Haroon Bhorat & Ravi Kanbur & Natasha Mayet, 2012. "The Impact of Sectoral Minimum Wage Laws on Employment, Wages and Hours of Work in South Africa," Working Papers 12154, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    20. Cipollone, Angela & Patacchini, Eleonora & Vallanti, Giovanna, 2013. "Women Labor Market Participation in Europe: Novel Evidence on Trends and Shaping Factors," IZA Discussion Papers 7710, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    21. Síle O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2007. "The part-time wage penalty in European countries: how large is it for men?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(7), pages 571-603, November.
    22. Joris Ghysels & Wim Van Lancker, 2010. "The unequal benefits of family activation: an analysis of the social distribution of family policy among families with young children," Working Papers 1008, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    23. Joan R. Rodgers, 2003. "Are Part-Time Workers poor?," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 6(1), pages 177-193, March.
    24. Wim Van Lancker & Joris Ghysels, 2011. "Who reaps the benefits? The social distribution of public childcare in Sweden and Flanders," Working Papers 1106, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    25. Henning Lohmann & Ive Marx, 2008. "The Different Faces of In-Work Poverty Across Welfare State Regimes," Chapters, in: Hans-Jürgen Andreß & Henning Lohmann (ed.), The Working Poor in Europe, chapter 1, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    26. David Neumark & DMark Schweitzer & DaWilliam Wascher, 2004. "Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    part-time employment; in-work poverty; social policy; working time; labour market institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hdl:wpaper:1603. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wim Van Lancker) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Wim Van Lancker to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csbuabe.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.