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Getting a full-time job as a part-time unemployed: How much does spatial context matter?

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  • Joel Karlsson

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  • Jonas Månsson

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which differences in the probability to exit from part-time unemployment to a full-time job are accountable for by spatial contextual factors and individual characteristics. To correctly incorporate contextual effects, a multilevel analysis is applied using a mixed-effects model to explore whether contextual factors account for differences in the probability of transition to full-time employment between individuals with different characteristics. The results indicate that there is a contextual effect and that there are some spatial spill-over effects from neighbouring municipalities, and that the unemployment rate partly explains the context variability. Furthermore, the contextual effect is found to be especially large for individuals without a university degree. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Joel Karlsson & Jonas Månsson, 2014. "Getting a full-time job as a part-time unemployed: How much does spatial context matter?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(1), pages 179-195, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:53:y:2014:i:1:p:179-195
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-014-0623-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Meyer, Bruce D, 1990. "Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment Spells," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(4), pages 757-782, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    J64; C31; R59;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • R59 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Other

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