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Dual tracks: part-time work in life-cycle employment for British women

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  • Sara Connolly

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  • Mary Gregory

Abstract

Almost half the women in work in the UK work part-time, but views conflict: does this support a woman`s career or is it a dead-end trap? Cohort data on labour market involvement to age 42 show highly varied pathways through full/part-time/non-employment. Econometric estimation confirms that individual characteristics matter, but labour market history is particularly powerful. Part-time work serves two different functions. A history of full-time work even including spells in part-time or non-employment, tends to lead back to full-time work, so supporting a career. Part-time work combined with non-employment is unlikely to lead to full-time work, and is a trap.
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Suggested Citation

  • Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2010. "Dual tracks: part-time work in life-cycle employment for British women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 907-931, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:23:y:2010:i:3:p:907-931 DOI: 10.1007/s00148-009-0249-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Booth, Alison L & Jenkins, Stephen P & Serrano, Carlos Garcia, 1999. " New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(2), pages 167-197, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David De Wachter & Karel Neels, 2011. "Educational differentials in fertility intentions and outcomes: family formation in Flanders in the early 1990s," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, pages 227-258.
    2. Helena Corrales Herrero & Beatriz Rodríguez Prado, 2011. "El empleo a tiempo parcial entre los jóvenes: Puente o trampa," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 42, pages 677-692 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    3. Carmichael, Fiona & Ercolani, Marco G., 2016. "Unpaid caregiving and paid work over life-courses: Different pathways, diverging outcomes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1-11.
    4. Andrea Garnero & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2013. "Part-time Work, Wages and Productivity:Evidence from Belgian Matched Panel Data," DULBEA Working Papers 13-08, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Daniel Fernandez, 2009. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Working Papers Economia wp09-04, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
    6. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2007. "Part-time Employment Can Be a Life-time Setback for Earnings: A Study of British Women 1975-2001," Economics Series Working Papers 358, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Fernández-Kranz, Daniel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2011. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 591-606, October.
    8. Kyyrä, Tomi & Arranz, José María & García-Serrano, Carlos, 2017. "Does Part-Time Work Help Unemployed Workers to Find Full-Time Work? Evidence from Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 10770, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Part-time work; Female labour supply; Life-cycle; J16; J22; J62;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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