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Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-Time Work: Evidence from Korea

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  • Taehyun Ahn

    () (Department of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul)

Abstract

I examine employment dynamics of married women with a particular focus on the role of part-time work using panel data from South Korea. Using a dynamic multinomial logit model with random effects, I find that state dependence is overestimated when I ignore unobserved heterogeneity and the endogenous nature of initial states. The estimated results also indicate that a part-time work alternative substantially reduces the probability of being out of the labor market for mothers of young children and that the probability of moving into full-time employment is highest among all transition probabilities for part-time workers. Along with the finding that part-time workers are more likely to have been nonemployed than to have worked full-time in the previous year, these results suggest that part-time employment may act as a stepping stone toward full-time work for women who have been out of the labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Taehyun Ahn, 2010. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-Time Work: Evidence from Korea," Working Papers 1003, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgo:wpaper:1003
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Booth, Alison L & Jenkins, Stephen P & Serrano, Carlos Garcia, 1999. " New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(2), pages 167-197, May.
    2. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2005. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 39-54.
    3. Victoria Prowse, 2012. "Modeling Employment Dynamics With State Dependence and Unobserved Heterogeneity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 411-431, April.
    4. Knights, Stephen & Harris, Mark N & Loundes, Joanne, 2002. "Dynamic Relationships in the Australian Labour Market: Heterogeneity and State Dependence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(242), pages 284-298, September.
    5. Myoung-Jae Lee & Yoon-Hee Tae, 2005. "Analysis of Labour Participation Behaviour of Korean Women with Dynamic Probit and Conditional Logit," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(1), pages 71-91, February.
    6. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    7. Dean R. Hyslop, 1999. "State Dependence, Serial Correlation and Heterogeneity in Intertemporal Labor Force Participation of Married Women," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1255-1294, November.
    8. Heckman, James J & Willis, Robert J, 1977. "A Beta-logistic Model for the Analysis of Sequential Labor Force Participation by Married Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(1), pages 27-58, February.
    9. Flinn, C. & Heckman, J., 1982. "New methods for analyzing structural models of labor force dynamics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 115-168, January.
    10. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
    11. James J. Heckman, 1981. "Heterogeneity and State Dependence," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in Labor Markets, pages 91-140 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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