IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/epo/papers/2007-09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Understanding Low-Wage Work in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Heather Boushey
  • Shawn Fremstad
  • Rachel Gragg
  • Margy Waller

Abstract

Over 40 million jobs in the United States - about 1 in 3 - pay low wages ($11.11 per hour or less) and often do not offer employment benefits like health insurance, retirement savings accounts, paid sick days or family leave. These low-wage jobs are replacing jobs that have historically supported a broad middle class. This report provides a clear and sobering picture of the low-wage labor market through analysis of labor market data, including: downward wage trends over time, poor work conditions, largest occupations, and declining mobility. The authors used a social inclusion definition of low-wage work that allows for comparison among jobs in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Boushey & Shawn Fremstad & Rachel Gragg & Margy Waller, 2007. "Understanding Low-Wage Work in the United States," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2007-09, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2007-09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.inclusionist.org/files/lowwagework.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dean Baker, 2007. "Stagnation in the Drug Development Process: Are Patents the Problem?," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2007-07, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Grimshaw, Damian., 2011. "What do we know about low wage work and low wage workers? : Analysing the definitions, patterns, causes and consequences in international perspective," ILO Working Papers 994648583402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. John Schmitt & Hye Jin Rho, 2008. "The Reagan Question: Are You Better Off Now Than You Were Eight Years Ago?," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-27, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    3. Grimshaw, Damian., 2014. "At work but earning less : trends in decent pay and minimum wages for young people," ILO Working Papers 994862833402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Gerhard Reinecke & Damian Grimshaw, 2015. "Labour market inequality between youth and adults: a special case?," Chapters,in: Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality, chapter 14, pages 361-398 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. John Schmitt, 2008. "Unions and Upward Mobility for African-American Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-11, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    6. John Schmitt, 2009. "Unions and Upward Mobility for Service-Sector Workers," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2009-14, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    7. repec:ilo:ilowps:486283 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Randy Albelda, 2013. "Low-wage mothers on the edge in the US," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 16, pages 257-272 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Janine Berg (ed.), 2015. "Labour Markets, Institutions and Inequality," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16143, April.
    10. David R. Howell, Mamadou Diallo, 2007. "WP 2007-6 Charting U.S. Economic Performance with Alternative Labor Market Indicators: The Importance of Accounting for Job Quality," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2007-6, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    11. Dean Baker, 2008. "The Key to Stabilizing House Prices: Bring Them Down," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-32, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2007-09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ceprdus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.