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Joshua Ballance

Personal Details

First Name:Joshua
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ballance
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RePEc Short-ID:pba1877
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(50%) Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.bos.frb.org/
RePEc:edi:frbbous (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Economic Research
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.bos.frb.org/economic/
RePEc:edi:efrbous (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sasser Modestino, Alicia & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: Changes in Employer Skill Requirements over the Business Cycle," Working Paper Series 16-014, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Joshua Ballance & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Articles

  1. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag & Joshua Ballance, 2020. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(4), pages 793-805, October.
  2. Ballance, Joshua & Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2020. "“No more credit score”: Employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sasser Modestino, Alicia & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: Changes in Employer Skill Requirements over the Business Cycle," Working Paper Series 16-014, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    Cited by:

    1. Yusuf Mercan & Benjamin Schoefer & Petr Sedláček, 2020. "A Congestion Theory of Unemployment Fluctuations," CESifo Working Paper Series 8731, CESifo.
    2. Shrestha, Rashesh & Coxhead, Ian, 2018. "Export boom, employment bust? The paradox of Indonesia's displaced workers, 2000-14," CEI Working Paper Series 2018-6, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Murillo Campello & Gaurav Kankanhalli & Pradeep Muthukrishnan, 2020. "Corporate Hiring under COVID-19: Labor Market Concentration, Downskilling, and Income Inequality," NBER Working Papers 27208, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    5. Bhuller, Manudeep & Kostol, Andreas Ravndal & Vigtel, Trond Christian, 2020. "How Broadband Internet Affects Labor Market Matching," IZA Discussion Papers 12895, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Azar, José & Marinescu, Ioana E. & Steinbaum, Marshall & Taska, Bledi, 2018. "Concentration in US Labor Markets: Evidence from Online Vacancy Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11379, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Brad Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, 2016. "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," NBER Working Papers 22762, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Pater, Robert & Szkola, Jaroslaw & Kozak, Marcin, 2019. "A method for measuring detailed demand for workers' competences," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 13, pages 1-30.
    9. Alekseeva, Liudmila & Azar, José & Giné, Mireia & Samila, Sampsa & Taska, Bledi, 2021. "The demand for AI skills in the labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    10. Mary A. Burke & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Shahriar Sadighi & Rachel B. Sederberg & Bledi Taska, 2019. "No Longer Qualified? Changes in the Supply and Demand for Skills within Occupations," Working Papers 20-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    11. Azar, José & Huet-Vaughn, Emiliano & Marinescu, Ioana & Taska, Bledi & von Wachter, Till, 2019. "Minimum Wage Employment Effects and Labor Market Concentration," CEPR Discussion Papers 14239, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Monica Mihaela Maer Matei & Anamaria Beatrice Aldea, 2019. "Employers’ Requirements for Data Scientists - an Analysis of Job Posts," Logos Universalitate Mentalitate Educatie Noutate - Sectiunea Stiinte Economice si Administrative/ Logos Universality Mentality Education Novelty - Section: Economical and Administrative Sciences, Editura Lumen, Department of Economics, vol. 4(1), pages 21-32, December.
    13. Robert E. Hall & Marianna Kudlyak, 2020. "Why Has the US Economy Recovered So Consistently from Every Recession in the Past 70 Years?," Working Paper Series 2020-20, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    14. Lyu, Wenjing & Liu, Jin, 2021. "Soft skills, hard skills: What matters most? Evidence from job postings," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 300(C).
    15. Jesse Rothstein, 2020. "The Lost Generation? Labor Market Outcomes for Post Great Recession Entrants," NBER Working Papers 27516, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Christopher Huckfeldt, 2018. "Understanding the Scarring Effect of Recessions," 2018 Meeting Papers 1207, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    17. Grinis, Inna, 2017. "The STEM requirements of "non-STEM" jobs: evidence from UK online vacancy postings and implications for skills & knowledge shortages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85123, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Robert Clifford & Daniel Shoag, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    19. Ian Burn & Patrick Button & Luis Felipe Munguia Corella & David Neumark, 2019. "Older Workers Need Not Apply? Ageist Language in Job Ads and Age Discrimination in Hiring," NBER Working Papers 26552, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Peter Q. Blair & David J. Deming, 2020. "Structural Increases in Skill Demand after the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 26680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Mindaugas Butkus & Kristina Matuzeviciute & Dovile Rupliene & Janina Seputiene, 2020. "Does Unemployment Responsiveness to Output Change Depend on Age, Gender, Education, and the Phase of the Business Cycle?," Economies, MDPI, vol. 8(4), pages 1-29, November.
    22. Stephanie Aaronson & Mary C. Daly & William L. Wascher & David W. Wilcox, 2019. "Okun Revisited: Who Benefits Most from a Strong Economy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-072, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    23. Alekseeva, Liudmila & Azar, José & Gine, Mireia & Samila, Sampsa & Taska, Bledi, 2020. "The Demand for AI Skills in the Labor Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 14320, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    24. Marcus Dillender, 2019. "Computerization of White Collar Jobs," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 19-310, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    25. Richard Friberg & Mark Sanctuary, 2020. "Exchange rate risk and the skill composition of labor," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 156(2), pages 287-312, May.
    26. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    27. Emilio Colombo & Alberto Marcato, 2021. "Skill Demand and Labour Market Concentration: Theory and Evidence from Italian Vacancies," DISEIS - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo dis2104, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo (DISEIS).

  2. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    Cited by:

    1. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Pascual Restrepo, 2018. "Low-Skill and High-Skill Automation," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(2), pages 204-232.
    3. Ziegler, Lennart, 2021. "Skill Demand and Wages. Evidence from Linked Vacancy Data," IZA Discussion Papers 14511, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Sepulveda, C & Gallego, J & Cardenas, J & Sarango, J & Ropero, S, 2020. "Empleabilidad e informalidad: un análisis del mercado laboral juvenil para 5 países latinoamericanos," Documentos de trabajo - Alianza EFI 018991, Alianza EFI.
    5. Claudia Macaluso, 2017. "Skill Remoteness and Post-layoff Labor Market Outcomes," 2017 Meeting Papers 569, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Paulsen, Richard J., 2019. "Reducing inequality summer by summer: Lessons from an evaluation of the Boston Summer Youth Employment Program," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 40-53.
    7. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 24906, December.
    8. David Deming & Lisa B. Kahn, 2015. "Skill Requirements across Firms and Labor Markets: Evidence from Job Postings for Professionals," NBER Chapters, in: Firms and the Distribution of Income: The Roles of Productivity and Luck, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Enghin Atalay & Sebastian Sotelo & Daniel Tannenbaum, 2021. "The Geography of Job Tasks," Working Papers 21-27, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    10. Kettemann, Andreas & Mueller, Andreas I. & Zweimüller, Josef, 2018. "Vacancy Durations and Entry Wages: Evidence from Linked Vacancy-Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11852, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Grinis, Inna, 2017. "The STEM requirements of "non-STEM" jobs: evidence from UK online vacancy postings and implications for skills & knowledge shortages," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85123, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Robert Clifford & Daniel Shoag, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    13. Ballance, Joshua & Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2020. "“No more credit score”: Employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    14. Weinstein, Russell, 2021. "Graduating from a Less Selective University during a Recession: Evidence from Mobility Report Cards and Employer Recruiting," IZA Discussion Papers 14462, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Marcus Dillender, 2019. "Computerization of White Collar Jobs," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 19-310, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    16. Radu Vranceanu & Angela Sutan, 2021. "Who should pay the bill for employee upskilling?," Working Papers hal-02977891, HAL.
    17. Liis Roosaar & Urmas Varblane & Jaan Masso, 2020. "Productivity Gains From Labour Churning In Economic Crisis: Do Foreign Firms Gain More?," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 125, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    18. Forsythe, Eliza & Wu, Jhih-Chian, 2021. "Explaining Demographic Heterogeneity in Cyclical Unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    19. Adely, Fida Issa J. & Mitra, Ankushi & Mohamed, Menatalla & Shaham, Adam, 2021. "Poor education, unemployment and the promise of skills: The hegemony of the “skills mismatch” discourse," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
    20. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    21. Edward P. Lazear & Kathryn L. Shaw & Christopher T. Stanton, 2016. "Who Gets Hired? The Importance of Finding an Open Slot," NBER Working Papers 22202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Joshua Ballance & Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Cited by:

    1. Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2016. ""No More Credit Score": Emplyer Credit Check Bans and Signal Substitution," Working Paper Series 16-008, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Brad Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, 2016. "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," NBER Working Papers 22762, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Karolien Lenaerts & Miroslav Beblavý & Brian Fabo, 2016. "Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    4. Barbara Ermini & Luca Papi & Francesca Scaturro, 2017. "Over education and the great recession. The case of italian PH.D graduates," Working Papers 420, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 24906, December.
    6. Robert Clifford & Daniel Shoag, 2016. "“No more credit score”: employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Working Papers 16-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    7. Ballance, Joshua & Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2020. "“No more credit score”: Employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    8. Marcus Dillender, 2019. "Computerization of White Collar Jobs," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 19-310, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    9. Liis Roosaar & Urmas Varblane & Jaan Masso, 2020. "Productivity Gains From Labour Churning In Economic Crisis: Do Foreign Firms Gain More?," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 125, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    10. Forsythe, Eliza & Wu, Jhih-Chian, 2021. "Explaining Demographic Heterogeneity in Cyclical Unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    11. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.

Articles

  1. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Daniel Shoag & Joshua Ballance, 2020. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(4), pages 793-805, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Ballance, Joshua & Clifford, Robert & Shoag, Daniel, 2020. "“No more credit score”: Employer credit check bans and signal substitution," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Card, David & Colella, Fabrizio & Lalive, Rafael, 2021. "Gender Preferences in Job Vacancies and Workplace Gender Diversity," CEPR Discussion Papers 16619, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-09-11 2016-10-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2015-09-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (1) 2016-10-02. Author is listed
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2015-05-09. Author is listed

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