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Skill Requirements across Firms and Labor Markets: Evidence from Job Postings for Professionals

Author

Listed:
  • David Deming
  • Lisa B. Kahn

Abstract

We study variation in skill demands for professionals across firms and labor markets. We categorize a wide range of keywords found in job ads into ten general skills. There is substantial variation in these skill requirements, even within narrowly defined occupations. Focusing particularly on cognitive and social skills, we find positive correlations between each skill and external measures of pay and firm performance. We also find evidence of a cognitive social-skill complementarity for both outcomes. As a whole, the job skills have explanatory power in pay and firm performance regressions, beyond what is available in widely-used labor market data.

Suggested Citation

  • David Deming & Lisa B. Kahn, 2017. "Skill Requirements across Firms and Labor Markets: Evidence from Job Postings for Professionals," NBER Working Papers 23328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23328
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph G. Altonji & Lisa B. Kahn & Jamin D. Speer, 2014. "Trends in Earnings Differentials across College Majors and the Changing Task Composition of Jobs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 387-393, May.
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    9. Brad J. Hershbein & Lisa B. Kahn, 2016. "Do Recessions Accelerate Routine-Biased Technological Change? Evidence from Vacancy Postings," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-254, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Hoeschler & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2017. "The Relative Importance of Personal Characteristics for the Hiring of Young Workers," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0142, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Jan 2018.
    2. Nuarpear Warn Lekfuangfu & Voraprapa Nakavachara & Paphatsorn Sawaengsuksant, 2017. "Glancing at Labour Market Mismatch with User-generated Internet Data," PIER Discussion Papers 53, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Jan 2017.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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