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Routinization, Within-Occupation Task Changes and Long-Run Employment Dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Davide Consoli

    (INGENIO CSIC-UPV)

  • Giovanni Marin

    (Department of Economics, Society and Politics, University of Urbino Carlo Bo and SEEDS)

  • Francesco Rentocchini

    (European Commission, Joint Research Centre and Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods, University of Milan)

  • Francesco Vona

    (University of Milan, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and OFCE, Sciences Po Abstract: The present study adds to the literature on routinization and employment by capturing within-occupation task changes over the period 1980-2010. The main contributions are the measurement of such changes and the combination of two data sources on occupational task content for the United States: the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the Occupational Information Network. We show that within-occupation reorientation away from routine tasks: i) accounts for 1/3 of the decline in routine-task use; ii) accelerates in the 1990s, decelerates in the 2000s but with significant convergence across occupations; iii) allows workers to escape the employment and wage decline, conditional on the initial level of routine-task intensity. The latter finding suggests that task reorientation is a key channel through which labour markets adapt to various forms of labour-saving technological change.)

Abstract

The present study adds to the literature on routinization and employment by capturing within occupation task changes over the period 1980-2010. The main contributions are the measurement of such changes and the combination of two data sources on occupational task content for the United States: the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and the Occupational Information Network. We show that within-occupation reorientation away from routine tasks: i) accounts for 1/3 of the decline in routine-task use; ii) accelerates in the 1990s, decelerates in the 2000s but with significant convergence across occupations; iii) allows workers to escape the employment and wage decline, conditional on the initial level of routine-task intensity. The latter finding suggests that task reorientation is a key channel through which labour markets adapt to various forms of labour-saving technological change.

Suggested Citation

  • Davide Consoli & Giovanni Marin & Francesco Rentocchini & Francesco Vona, 2022. "Routinization, Within-Occupation Task Changes and Long-Run Employment Dynamics," Working Papers 2022.33, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2022.33
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    2. Marin, Giovanni & Vona, Francesco, 2023. "Finance and the reallocation of scientific, engineering and mathematical talent," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(5).
    3. Marco Capasso & Michael Spjelkavik Mark, 2021. "The Evolving Economic Employment of ICT Education: The Case of Norway," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(15), pages 1-18, July.
    4. Mauro Caselli & Edwin Fourrier-Nicolai & Andrea Fracasso & Sergio Scicchitano, 2024. "Digital Technologies and Firms’ Employment and Training," CESifo Working Paper Series 11056, CESifo.
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    7. Florent Bordot & Andre Lorentz, 2021. "Automation and labor market polarization in an evolutionary model with heterogeneous workers," LEM Papers Series 2021/32, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tasks; Routinization; Technological Change; Employment Dynamics; Race between Technology and Education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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